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Everything Is Waiting For You

--by David Whyte (Apr 09, 2018)


Your great mistake is to act the drama
 as if you were alone. As if life
 were a progressive and cunning crime
 with no witness to the tiny hidden
 transgressions. To feel abandoned is to deny
 the intimacy of your surroundings. Surely,
 even you, at times, have felt the grand array;
 the swelling presence, and the chorus, crowding
 out your solo voice. You must note
 the way the soap dish enables you,
 or the window latch grants you freedom.
 Alertness is the hidden discipline of familiarity.
 The stairs are your mentor of things
 to come, the doors have always been there
 to frighten you and invite you,
 and the tiny speaker in the phone
 is your dream-ladder to divinity.

Put down the weight of your aloneness and ease into the
 conversation. The kettle is singing
 even as it pours you a drink, the cooking pots
 have left their arrogant aloofness and
 seen the good in you at last. All the birds
 and creatures of the world are unutterably
 themselves. Everything is waiting for you.

David Whyte from Everything is Waiting for You.

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14 Previous Reflections:

 
On Apr 14, 2018 Nick Smith wrote:

nice post



On Apr 13, 2018 Oliver Mills wrote:

 The notion of feeling alone unknowingly suggests a consciousness deficit. We are never alone, since the universe in its vastness provides everything. It is therefore mistaken to feel alone. There is nature in all its bounty, our thoughts can take us to new dimensions, awareness revels what initially was thought not to be present, and when we see with new eyes, we realise we could never be alone, since spiritual  insight  reveals new worlds an new experiences to garner. I feel the intimacy of my surroundings, when I tend to our garden. I touch the trees, and the wind touches me by blowing on my body. When my dogs bark, I hear songs. The tweet of the birds wakes me from unwanted thoughts. The weight of my aloneness is put down when I change my way of thinking, interpret experiences in a new way, and open myself in an unjudgmental way to receive the gifts the yet unknown brings.  



1 reply: Amy | Post Your Reply
On Apr 11, 2018 RICHARD wrote:

 We are here for connection and expression, for relationship and intimacy. We are here to bake in the presence of another and let the aroma of our maturing be that which inspires and illumines, cares for and serves the other.  There is always a pouring out, a giving away, a making space for.  Then a time for stillness to allow what is wanting to come.  And there is always something, something good, something appropriate that is wanting to come.  It is a cultivation of appreciation of all that is, and has been. It is a discriminating awareness.  It is attentive discernment.  It is touching the garment of truth. Beyond wants, needs, and desires what is here?  What is the truth of this moment as you?  The famed Ramana Maharshi was known for asking his students to ask themselves over and over, “Who am I?” (Alternatively, having a dyad partner ask you “Who are you?”)  … until they fall out of the question and  See full.

 We are here for connection and expression, for relationship and intimacy. We are here to bake in the presence of another and let the aroma of our maturing be that which inspires and illumines, cares for and serves the other. 
There is always a pouring out, a giving away, a making space for.  Then a time for stillness to allow what is wanting to come.  And there is always something, something good, something appropriate that is wanting to come.  It is a cultivation of appreciation of all that is, and has been. It is a discriminating awareness.  It is attentive discernment.  It is touching the garment of truth.

Beyond wants, needs, and desires what is here?  What is the truth of this moment as you?  The famed Ramana Maharshi was known for asking his students to ask themselves over and over, “Who am I?” (Alternatively, having a dyad partner ask you “Who are you?”)  … until they fall out of the question and into the understanding of the reason for the question.  So, if you were to stop asking yourself this question and go beyond.  If you no longer “saw” yourself as a who what is left?

Our part is to look in the mirror and see “who” is really there.  And then see that in the other.
We are never alone. What is deeply there is always there.

Do you see yourself today as the river or the channel of the river? It is kind of asking yourself “Are you yin or yang?”, or more one than the other?  As the river you know yourself as flow.

As the channel you know yourself as a guidance for that flow, banks that funnel the energy and direct it.  What is your perception?  If you drop the “who” what is here?

Beyond grasping to have there is what is already, always here.  Empty your cup to fill it with that understanding.  Then offer that cup to another.

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1 reply: Jo | Post Your Reply
On Apr 10, 2018 Shashank Shekher wrote:

 Early this morning I was watering the plants in my small garden. Since it was quite early in the morning I was all by myself as nobody was up and there were no passerby in the lane. Suddenly I started to sing few slokas in praise for Lord Shiva and I felt so good and connected to nature. I never sing like that and it was the first time I did it and felt connected to the trees and plants to the water and to the gentle cool breeze and to the chirping of the birds. Then I lay my eyes to this article “Everything is waiting for you” which taught me to listen to the song of kettle... how inspiring and unthinkable!!



On Apr 10, 2018 Mukti wrote:
 Hmmm Alone is a tricky word. It is in my coming to terms with being alone and responsible for my life, and how I live it, that I have found the greatest ease and freedom to be myself. Even in partnership with a great human I am especially alone in my process and choices. I used to hover in places where I needed constant reassurance. Ain’t was a lot of baggage not taking hold of my aloneness. However, I am very aware of how I am held in spirit by the energy around me. The birds, the trees, the doorknob, the door... they do speak to me when I am connected. I even have a pretty great angel that has communicated warning and solace along my days. Words.... they can define and confine at the same time. Ah to be a spirit on a human journey. 
 

On Apr 10, 2018 Sandra E.M. Outerbridge wrote:

 I learned that we are only victims if we allow ourselves to be. When we mature we realize that w  are never alone in our struggles because there is always someone going through the similar circumstances and there is always a great number of people who can help.



On Apr 10, 2018 Rose wrote:
 I Love this Poem "everything is waiting for us" yes..in the now moment....not future which would imply it's missing right now...which it never is...This invitation is both beautiful and intimate ......
 

On Apr 9, 2018 Annie wrote:

 When I ask myself the question, "if you weren't the victim or heroine of your story, who might you be?" In the silence of an answer the follows I often feel as if I am both nothing and everything and any loneliness immediately somehow dissolves. I love this poem by David, I always have his poems close to hand, because from one poet to another, we both understand a need for aloneness, which at any given moment, can turn back on itself into a feeling of isolation



On Apr 8, 2018 Jagdish P Dave wrote:

 Feeling lonely, disconnected and depressed is sadly growing more in our society. We are born by intimacy, we survive by intimacy and thrive by intimacy. We need to open our mind and heart to be connected with the world of nature and others like us. We need to make a shift from I-It to I-Thou. How can I relate to the world of sound if I keep my ears plugged? How can I listen to the live silence of nature if I keep my mind noisy? How can I smell the fragrance of blooming flowers if I keep my nose plugged? How can I feel the warmth of your touch if I keep my hands off? How can I feel your presence if I am not present with you?. How can I see me if I am not awake? The universe offers countless gifts to us. We need to empty our task -loaded hands to receive them. Three days ago my grandson invited me to do mindfulness meditation with him in the early morning  hours. We sat in our front yard sitting silently with open heart and open mind. During the twenty minutes of mi  See full.

 Feeling lonely, disconnected and depressed is sadly growing more in our society. We are born by intimacy, we survive by intimacy and thrive by intimacy. We need to open our mind and heart to be connected with the world of nature and others like us. We need to make a shift from I-It to I-Thou.

How can I relate to the world of sound if I keep my ears plugged? How can I listen to the live silence of nature if I keep my mind noisy? How can I smell the fragrance of blooming flowers if I keep my nose plugged? How can I feel the warmth of your touch if I keep my hands off? How can I feel your presence if I am not present with you?. How can I see me if I am not awake? The universe offers countless gifts to us. We need to empty our task -loaded hands to receive them.

Three days ago my grandson invited me to do mindfulness meditation with him in the early morning  hours. We sat in our front yard sitting silently with open heart and open mind. During the twenty minutes of mindfulness meditation, we got deeply connected with the touch of the cool air, the enchanting fragrance of the  blooming flowers , the sight of the rising sun and  the chirping of the birds.We also felt joyfully and deeply connected with each other without words.

Everything is waiting for us. Yes. We need to say YES to it and gracefully welcome it.

Namaste.Jagdish P Dave

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On Apr 8, 2018 david doane wrote:

 Feeling alone is a mistake, and an illusion, because we're really not alone.  No one is an island.  I don't think everyone or everything is waiting for me, but they are with me as part of this world, and I can reach out and connect rather than be alone.  It's not necessary to be alone.  I've been in groups in which I felt close connection with the others, and felt listened to, cared about and known.  Such experiences are grand, loving, and intimate.  When my aloneness is lonely, heavy, miserable for me, I put down the weight of my aloneness and reach out, or at least I can, and make an effort to connect with another.  For me, it often hasn't been easing into connection and often has felt difficult but it is preferable and holds more possibility than remaining in an aloneness that is miserable.  Usually I know that my aloneness is my own creation, and I know that my ending my aloneness and reaching out is also up to me.



On Apr 7, 2018 Amy wrote:

 Just today, stopped by a neighbor (flagged me down) that needed an ear, to not be alone and to shed a few tears.
Isolating ourselves is NEVER a good idea!  I felt very connected to Katie ... presence key!  



On Apr 6, 2018 Kristin Pedemonti wrote:

 The great mistake is thinking we are alone. If we have the courage to open up, share our truth, our vulnerability, our story, we quickly learn we are never alone in any experience. There is always at least one other person who has experienced something similar who can sit with us, listen, hold space and acknowledge our journey. I've been on both sides and it is healing and releasing . I would say the most "grand" way I ever experienced this time of intimacy was when I allowed myself to be extremely vulnerable in posting on Facebook about being in another depression and being deeply concerned about the darkness enveloping me. I had moved through depression before and was feeling dismayed that it had returned at a time when things seemed to be going so well. I reached out, first on Facebook, because I was too depressed to make a phone call and ask for physical presence. The outpouring of love, care, concern was beautifully overwhelming. It pulled me out of the darkness enough to a  See full.

 The great mistake is thinking we are alone. If we have the courage to open up, share our truth, our vulnerability, our story, we quickly learn we are never alone in any experience. There is always at least one other person who has experienced something similar who can sit with us, listen, hold space and acknowledge our journey. I've been on both sides and it is healing and releasing . I would say the most "grand" way I ever experienced this time of intimacy was when I allowed myself to be extremely vulnerable in posting on Facebook about being in another depression and being deeply concerned about the darkness enveloping me. I had moved through depression before and was feeling dismayed that it had returned at a time when things seemed to be going so well. I reached out, first on Facebook, because I was too depressed to make a phone call and ask for physical presence. The outpouring of love, care, concern was beautifully overwhelming. It pulled me out of the darkness enough to accept invitations of several people to come to visit me over tea or coloring books. They sat with me one on one and listened and hugged and were simply present. I've done the same for others and to be on the receiving end was deep and healing and appreciated beyond words. What helps put down aloneness is recalling the times when either I have been present for someone else or they were present for me and the rush of love felt in my heart. This is just the push needed to reach out again. <3 

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