Awakin.org

Waking up to Wisdom
In Stillness and Community

Nothing Else Matters

--by Scott Morrison (Apr 14, 2014)
Listen To Reading!

Stop dead in your tracks.
It doesn’t matter at all, what you’ve ever done, or not done.
It doesn’t matter how grandiose, self-centered,
arrogant, or neurotic you’ve ever been.
It doesn’t matter how brilliant you’ve been, or how stupid you’ve been.
It doesn’t matter what you’ve ever experienced, or not experienced.
It doesn’t matter how much good you’ve ever done, or how much harm you’ve ever done, your whole life long.
Nothing that has ever happened to you makes any difference at all.
It doesn’t make any difference how many times you’ve been enlightened, or not enlightened, or how powerful, profound, or intense those experiences may have been.
The only thing that matters, that really matters at all,
is whether you are willing to be completely alive, awake and free,
this very moment – this very instant.
The only thing that makes any difference – any difference at all,
is whether you are willing to let go of all mental and emotional -
all historical and future versions of yourself and your life,
and simply be what you are, completely and absolutely, right now.
We are simply awareness – pure, infinite, and wide open.
Our nature is to be unconditionally kind, honest, wise, and sincere,
tender, affectionate, sensitive, and compassionate,
without reservation, right now.
It’s the most natural thing in the world,
and there is nothing real in the way.
Everywhere is your home.
Everyone is your lover, your child, your mother, your father, your sister, and your brother, your best friend. Every one is your own reflection.
Your heart is aching to be What you are,
to be Everything that you are,
on this breath.
Don’t put it off another instant.

--Scott Morrison


Add Your Reflection:

Send me an email when a comment is added on this passage.
Name: Email:

36 Previous Reflections:

 
On Apr 17, 2014 Amit wrote:

 I was reading Stephen Covey and his first habit of being proactive. it must be 15 years ago. We are all so engrossed in this cause and effect world. We hardly know how to go beyond it. It is person with wisdom who sometimes wants to carry us there. As J. Krishnamurty said ' To go beyond the self-enclosing activities of the mind, you must understand them; and to understand them is to be aware of action in relationship, relationship to things, to people, and to ideas. In that relationship, which is the mirror, we begin to see ourselves, without any justification or condemnation; and from that wider and deeper knowledge of the ways of our own mind, it is possible to proceed further; then it is possible for the mind to be quiet." Being alert and awareful is a constant challenge and years of perceiving our action will only take us to our nature to be unconditionally kind, honest, wise, sincere, tender, affectionate, sensitive and compassionate. It is worth a try as you will  See full.

 I was reading Stephen Covey and his first habit of being proactive. it must be 15 years ago. We are all so engrossed in this cause and effect world. We hardly know how to go beyond it. It is person with wisdom who sometimes wants to carry us there. As J. Krishnamurty said ' To go beyond the self-enclosing activities of the mind, you must understand them; and to understand them is to be aware of action in relationship, relationship to things, to people, and to ideas. In that relationship, which is the mirror, we begin to see ourselves, without any justification or condemnation; and from that wider and deeper knowledge of the ways of our own mind, it is possible to proceed further; then it is possible for the mind to be quiet." Being alert and awareful is a constant challenge and years of perceiving our action will only take us to our nature to be unconditionally kind, honest, wise, sincere, tender, affectionate, sensitive and compassionate. It is worth a try as you will be so relieved once you are on that journey! 
Best wishes.
Amit

Hide full comment.

On Apr 16, 2014 Regina wrote:

 I think it sounds nice but I don't really feel this is a healthy philosophy. Those things DO matter. Kindness matters, justice matters, helping those in need matters, how we love and guide our children matters. Our prayers matter . Healing ourselves, our neighbor and this planet matters. Our unique talents and creativity matter. Our words matter, they can hurt or heal. Our experiences,  our prayers and meditations matter. If a baby cries and needs to be fed it DOES matter if we respond to her/his cry or not. Our individual spiritual evolution contributes to the evolution of humanity and vica versa . We are NOT independent of each other, but interdependent . I really don't buy this particular "spiritual relativity" teaching. Sorry, but I don't. We are here to love and care for each other and to me "love" is a verb ....



On Apr 16, 2014 Bonnie wrote:

 Thank you for this beautiful reflection on stopping dead in our tracks. That seems to be the sacred starting place, just remembering that one thing.  I wonder in that moment of stopping if the content of what rises in awareness is a little different for each of us, tailored (by grace perhaps) to meet our individual yearnings. In that moment of remembering to stop, for me there arises, like a tender gift, an openness to the possibility of deep and personal accompaniment and connection at many levels from ordinary friendship to the presence of the Divine. I wonder what it is that comes most naturally for others.

As for "our nature is to be unconditionally kind, honest, wise,... tender..."  Yes!



3 replies: Lfm, Amy, Sandra | Post Your Reply
On Apr 16, 2014 matthew wrote:

 Nothing matters until it does, healing without within. We'll hold the paradox of both truths. Your truth, my truth and the real truth. giggles, this article is healing and joyful



On Apr 16, 2014 Sridhar wrote:

 Nice article or poem (or what type of literary-philosophical piece of writing, I cannot place it). There are moments (even though  very short and very rare) in our lives, where we do let go off everything. Moments of "causeless joy", "boundless happiness" and "undefinable abandon" do occur. I felt such moments few times and for very short periods. These were interrupted by real world events (like a phone call, conveying not-so-pleasant news / compelling me to involved in an argument;  door bell of a salesperson etc) and again I came back into the life of emotional disturbances.
If such moments do happen, how to prolong them - that is the question. If we are able to fight and conquer emotional disturbances, that too in particular negative emotions, these moments can get extended.



3 replies: Conrad, A, Kim | Post Your Reply
On Apr 15, 2014 Deejay wrote:

 I love it.



On Apr 15, 2014 Sandra wrote:

 Focused on just this very thing, being here now, present to the truth of my/our real nature.  Helpful reminder!

Thanks!



On Apr 15, 2014 Susan wrote:

What a delightful article!  I enjoyed reading this immensely and was able to go with the flow of the 
generous recognition of  the majesty of being unencumbered by the egoic mind.



2 replies: Reyna, Susan | Post Your Reply
On Apr 15, 2014 Eric wrote:

 I think our nature is to be the exact opposite of this based upon the simple fact of evolution:  surviving no matter what:  war-like if necessary, dishonest if it gets us what we need to survive (or even to be happy for just a moment), and all that goes with that.  From Neanderthal to Kings to Silicon Valley, it never ends.

The second part of this:  it's my belief that those of us who can turn this inside out for extended periods of time and actually be unconditionally kind, honest, wise...without reservation...are the lucky few.

It would be a wonderful thing to achieve.



On Apr 15, 2014 Jack Schimmelman wrote:

 Two near death experiences and chronic life threatening illness for the last 6 yearshas changed me completely.  Forced me to shed shed shed all that is not necessary.  Still happening.  Here is one essay out of several that will explain one of these moments -- http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jack-schimmelman/life-lessons_b_4335668.html



On Apr 13, 2014 Abhishek Thakore wrote:

To me this passage occurs as an existential take on life (perhaps biased by my own world-view) - just that everything in our lives is constructed (purpose, meaning, morals) either consciously or unconsciously. Inherently, life just IS - devoid of any meaning.

To me unconditional kindness that is spontaneous is very different from kindness that comes from a construct (we should be kind / it is good to be kind). For me to be able to truly assert that my nature is unconditionally kind, that 'nature' has to be truly free from any baggage, any filters and any 'should's

To be anchored in such pure awareness, in the here and now, engaging with the cutting edge of life is not a very common experience for me - and in such moments, acts of kindness don't occur as kind - they just occur as actions (it is only later / after an instant that I classify it as kind)

The more we speak about it, the more we move away from it I feel :)



2 replies: Kim, M | Post Your Reply
On Apr 13, 2014 Yma Jo wrote:

 I agree with you!  The litany of "it does not matters" do matter.  The combination of all our experiences (matters) make us who we are and bring us to this moment.  It does matter.   Times I have felt most alive: When I caught my first fish (that feeling of life/pull at the end of my fishing line gave me a real rush!) Encounters with God (when I could literally feel him lay on top of me, in comfort, peace and Fatherly presence . . . The experience of God and His REALNESS), When I bird watch, listen to the coyotes yelp and howl in our backyard (yes, for real), walking my dog, feel the wind, soak in the warmth of Spring's sun, waterfalls (all things water), loving my husband, scuba diving in Belize (coming face to face with vivid color/beautiful tropical fish), having babies, experiencing birth, witnessing death to this life, anything Heaven (hearing people stories r/t their experiences of it), deep thought,  pondering the readings of Awakin.org., kno  See full.

 I agree with you!  The litany of "it does not matters" do matter.  The combination of all our experiences (matters) make us who we are and bring us to this moment.  It does matter.  
Times I have felt most alive:
When I caught my first fish (that feeling of life/pull at the end of my fishing line gave me a real rush!)
Encounters with God (when I could literally feel him lay on top of me, in comfort, peace and Fatherly presence . . . The experience of God and His REALNESS), When I bird watch, listen to the coyotes yelp and howl in our backyard (yes, for real), walking my dog, feel the wind, soak in the warmth of Spring's sun, waterfalls (all things water), loving my husband, scuba diving in Belize (coming face to face with vivid color/beautiful tropical fish), having babies, experiencing birth, witnessing death to this life, anything Heaven (hearing people stories r/t their experiences of it), deep thought,  pondering the readings of Awakin.org., knowing I am loved, driving my first car, answered prayer, And (I have to be honest) meeting you.
Please Lord, hear David.  That we ALL might experience "feeling alive" . . . And know it/he very much matters.

Hide full comment.

On Apr 13, 2014 david doane wrote:

 I feel myself resisting -- I don't agree with what the author is saying.  All those things he says don't matter, do matter.  I don't even agree with his saying that the only thing that matters is "whether you are willing to be completely alive."  As far as I know I've never been completely 100% alive -- well, maybe when I was intrauterine and for a short while after birth.  We are awareness, as he says, but we are not only awareness.  The author is speaking idealistically -- I don't know if it's human to be "unconditionally kind, honest, etc..."  I don't agree that there is nothing in the way -- living in this world in this form doesn't stop us but it is in the way.  As for letting go of all mental and emotional versions of myself to be what I am, I've done that to some degree sometimes, but as far as I know I've never let go of all mental and emotional versions of myself altogether.  I don't know if anyone has.  To be completely awar  See full.

 I feel myself resisting -- I don't agree with what the author is saying.  All those things he says don't matter, do matter.  I don't even agree with his saying that the only thing that matters is "whether you are willing to be completely alive."  As far as I know I've never been completely 100% alive -- well, maybe when I was intrauterine and for a short while after birth.  We are awareness, as he says, but we are not only awareness.  The author is speaking idealistically -- I don't know if it's human to be "unconditionally kind, honest, etc..."  I don't agree that there is nothing in the way -- living in this world in this form doesn't stop us but it is in the way.  As for letting go of all mental and emotional versions of myself to be what I am, I've done that to some degree sometimes, but as far as I know I've never let go of all mental and emotional versions of myself altogether.  I don't know if anyone has.  To be completely aware and alive, completely oneself, would be to not be in this world and not be part of it, and probably get one's throat cut in one way or another.  What I've accomplished so far is to sometimes be in the world but not of it, and to enjoy various amounts of aliveness along the way. 

Hide full comment.

On Apr 12, 2014 Blessings wrote:

 Personally, I frequently find myself letting go of "mental and emotional versions of myself" in order to jump into other people's thoughts, hearts, worlds, views, situations, ect.  I cannot be connected tightly to self when trying to understand/love another.  (I am unable to completely connect with another with a version of myself blocking the way.)
When I look/see/study/ponder the life another person, my focus is on "the other".  If I want to experience/hear/sense what another is feeling/saying/needing, in dropping "me" (and picking up Christ) I am more fine tuned to receive "versions of the other".  For this gift, I am very thankful.



On Apr 11, 2014 Conrad P Pritscher wrote:

 I cannot share an experience of the time that I let go of all mental and emotional versions of myself to be what I am because I have never experienced that. The assertion that "our nature is to be unconditionally kind, honest, wise and…"? is more of a question than an assertion. My sense is that we choose to be kind ,honest, wise etc. and it is easier to make that choice when I have no desires and when I notice myself as not separate from everyone and everything. I don't ever recall being absolutely or completely me or one with everyone and everything although I believe I am one with everyone and everything, I am constantly changing and evolving so I barely know who I am ant any given time. I am okay with that and the more I think about not knowing the more comfortable I am with not knowing.  People who know much make me a bit skeptical since I see them as a bit less open than those who know little. I wonder what the closedness contributes to what they are missi  See full.

 I cannot share an experience of the time that I let go of all mental and emotional versions of myself to be what I am because I have never experienced that. The assertion that "our nature is to be unconditionally kind, honest, wise and…"? is more of a question than an assertion. My sense is that we choose to be kind ,honest, wise etc. and it is easier to make that choice when I have no desires and when I notice myself as not separate from everyone and everything. I don't ever recall being absolutely or completely me or one with everyone and everything although I believe I am one with everyone and everything, I am constantly changing and evolving so I barely know who I am ant any given time. I am okay with that and the more I think about not knowing the more comfortable I am with not knowing.  People who know much make me a bit skeptical since I see them as a bit less open than those who know little. I wonder what the closedness contributes to what they are missing. missing. Thanks for the opportunity to respond. Warm and kind regards to everyone.

Hide full comment.

2 replies: Bob, Conrad | Post Your Reply