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Simplicity of the Heart

--by J. Krishnamurti (Sep 05, 2016)


Simplicity  of  the  heart  is  of  far  greater  importance  and  significance  than  simplicity  of possessions.  To  be  content  with  few  things  is  a  comparatively  easy  matter.  To  renounce comfort,  or  to  give  up  smoking  and  other  habits,  does  not  indicate  simplicity  of  heart.  To  put  on a  loincloth  in  a  world  that  is  taken  up  with  clothes,  comforts  and  distractions,  does  not  indicate a  free  being.  There  was  a  man  who  had  given  up  the  world  and  its  ways,  but  his  desires  and passions  were  consuming  him;  he  had  put  on  the  robes  of  a  monk,  but  he  did  not  know  peace. His  eyes  were  everlastingly  seeking,  and  his  mind  was  riven  by his  doubts  and  hopes. 

Outwardly you  discipline  and  renounce,  you  chart  your  course,  step  by  step,  to  reach  the  end.  You measure  the  progress  of  your  achievement  according  to  the  standards  of  virtue:  how  you  have given  up  this  or  that,  how  controlled  you  are  in  your  behavior,  how  tolerant  and  kind  you  are, and  so  on  and  on.  You  have  learnt  the  art  of  concentration,  and  you  withdraw  into  a  forest,  a monastery  or  a  darkened  room  to  meditate;  you  pass  your  days  in  prayer  and  watchfulness. Outwardly  you  have  made  your  life  simple,  and  through  this  thoughtful  and  calculated arrangement  you  hope  to  reach  the  bliss that  is  not  of  this  world.

But  is  reality  reached  through  external  control  and  sanctions?  Though  outward  simplicity,  the putting  aside  of  comfort,  is  obviously  necessary,  will this  gesture  open  the  door  to  reality?  To be  occupied  with  comfort  and  success  burdens  the  mind  and  the  heart,  and  there  must  be freedom  to  travel;  but  why  are  we  so  concerned  with  the  outward  gesture?  Why  are  we  so eagerly  determined  to  give  an  outward  expression  of  our  intention?  Is  it  the  fear  of  self-deception,  or  of  what  another  might  say?  Why  do  we  wish  to  convince  ourselves  of  our integrity?  Does  not  this  whole  problem  lie  in  the  desire  to  be  sure,  to  be  convinced  of  our  own importance  in  becoming?  

The  desire  to  be  is  the  beginning  of  complexity.  Driven  by  the  ever-increasing  desire  to  be, inwardly  and  outwardly,  we  accumulate  or  renounce,  cultivate  or  deny.  Seeing  that  time  steals all  things,  we  cling  to  the  timeless.  This  struggle  to  be,  positively  or  negatively,  through attachment  or  detachment,  can  never  be  resolved  by  any  outward  gesture,  discipline  or practice;  but  the  understanding  of  this  struggle  will  bring  about,  naturally  and  spontaneously, the  freedom  from  outward  and  inward  accumulation  with  their  conflicts.  Reality  is  not  to  be reached  through  detachment;  it  is  unattainable  through  any  means.  All  means  and  ends  are  a form  of  attachment,  and  they  must  cease  for  the  being  of  reality.

Excerpted from J. Krishnamurti's Commentaries on Living.

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On Sep 6, 2016 Marc wrote:

This sounds great and in isolation I agree. In the reality I live in, I see people need food, shelter, education, healthcare, transportation for one and one's loved ones. This gets ine into the means and end dynamic bc of spending your time on these needs. So how do you reconcile being forced to have these means and ends with having none?   



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On Sep 6, 2016 vic smyth wrote:

 I have learned to simply be myself and to let others be themselves.



On Sep 6, 2016 Kristin Pedemonti wrote:

 Reality shifts as we construct and deconstruct it each day through our perceptions and experiences and how we react. Simplicity of the heart happens when we do not try to control it. I've had this experience when allowing myself to fully immerse in the present. Example, yesterday at a dance in a park I felt fully free, alive, happy and filled with joy. There was no attachment to dancing a certain way, it was allowing the rhythms to fully connect internally and just move however my body decided. Liberating!



On Sep 5, 2016 Sunil wrote:

Beyond my understanding,creating more confusion than resolving it. Let us demystify the mysticism of spirituality. Let us not complicate it further & further.Let us help ourselves the common beings you and me with simple ,straight easy to follow guidance from the enlightened. Love



On Sep 5, 2016 Saroj wrote:

 Recently I have spent a lot of time with a three year old grand daughter, a puppy and a new born. Just watching them go through daily life is a lesson in pure joy that comes from just being and having very simple minds  with no agenda, no show and  no outward or inward fear. There is  pure joy in just being and having the simplicity of heart,  I wish I could learn from them and not the other way around. 



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On Sep 5, 2016 david doane wrote:

I think in this passage reality is the Ground of Being, and reality is unattainable through goal-directed behavior, whatever that may be.  Goal directed behavior is a means to an end, and being attached to goal directed behavior gets in the way of pure being which unites us with the reality of the Ground of Being.  Reality is attainable in being purposeless in the moment.  I guess the closest I've come to simplicity beyond all inner and outer desires has been in moments of intimacy with nature or with another and in moments of meditation.  Attachment to desire is attachment.  'Reality' is attainable by letting go of desire and simply being.  As I see it, that is what the teachings that focus on being teach.  To attain 'reality' we must purposelessly be what the teachings are about and not be attached to any means.



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On Sep 4, 2016 Abhishek Thakore wrote:

This morning, a friend cited Krishnamurthi as a defense for him not engaging in social action. My invitation to him was to connect to a 'larger' cause, to respond to the challenges and avoidable suffering that he sees rather than a self-indulgent form of spirituality.  Krishnamurthi and Gandhi both seem to be approaching Truth from different ways - here, there is a tangential reference to Gandhi's experiments with truth as yet another 'trap' of the mind, a non-simplicity of the heart that desires to be 'more' virtuous That seems like the scientific method, though in that method too is a 'desire' to arrive at Truth, which Krishnamurthi insisted is a pathless land. Though again I wonder if Gandhi's experiments were with the intent to reach a land of bliss or just to arrive closer to Truth? Moreover, in K's observations is an inward-outward, me-other dichotomy, that I guess disappears in some way in a beyond-language Truth-land that K speaks about. The irony seems to be th  See full.

This morning, a friend cited Krishnamurthi as a defense for him not engaging in social action. My invitation to him was to connect to a 'larger' cause, to respond to the challenges and avoidable suffering that he sees rather than a self-indulgent form of spirituality. 

Krishnamurthi and Gandhi both seem to be approaching Truth from different ways - here, there is a tangential reference to Gandhi's experiments with truth as yet another 'trap' of the mind, a non-simplicity of the heart that desires to be 'more' virtuous

That seems like the scientific method, though in that method too is a 'desire' to arrive at Truth, which Krishnamurthi insisted is a pathless land. Though again I wonder if Gandhi's experiments were with the intent to reach a land of bliss or just to arrive closer to Truth?

Moreover, in K's observations is an inward-outward, me-other dichotomy, that I guess disappears in some way in a beyond-language Truth-land that K speaks about. The irony seems to be the challenge of communicating about a reality beyond language, through concepts creating potential verbal traps (like the seed question itself?)

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On Sep 3, 2016 Jagdish P Dave wrote:

Natural  way of living is a free way of living. It is a way of living different from  the habitual and conditioned way of living. It is a way of living without getting attached to our desires. Our attachment to desires makes us bound by our desires. And we all know that when we are bound by the desires, we go through the inevitable swings of pleasure and pain, elation and depression, ups and down in our life.  Suffering arises from our attachment to desires. Wisdom traditions have offered different ways of liberating ourselves from the clutches of our desires. If we pay our full attention to what is happening in our body, mind and heart.  We get helpful feed back from our own selves. We pause, recognize,  and allow ourselves to witness  without judging what is happening in the present moment. We inquire and get an insight and an answer from within. This process helps us to make a wise choice. We learn not to make a self hurting tight fist.If we don't make  See full.

Natural  way of living is a free way of living. It is a way of living different from  the habitual and conditioned way of living. It is a way of living without getting attached to our desires. Our attachment to desires makes us bound by our desires. And we all know that when we are bound by the desires, we go through the inevitable swings of pleasure and pain, elation and depression, ups and down in our life.  Suffering arises from our attachment to desires.

Wisdom traditions have offered different ways of liberating ourselves from the clutches of our desires. If we pay our full attention to what is happening in our body, mind and heart.  We get helpful feed back from our own selves. We pause, recognize,  and allow ourselves to witness  without judging what is happening in the present moment. We inquire and get an insight and an answer from within. This process helps us to make a wise choice. We learn not to make a self hurting tight fist.If we don't make a  tight fist, we don't hurt ourselves.In the quiet inner space, we make a conflict free wise choice.

It is my understanding that it is the self that liberates itself. Such ongoing  non-judgmental awareness has helped me to walk on the samyak- the right path.We need to remain awake inwardly to enlighten our path.This is my everyday practice of living.

May we let the light within us shine to  guide us to walk on the natural, wholesome, and blissful way of living!

Namaste.

Jagdish P Dave'
  

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