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Learning Not to Be Afraid of Things That Are Real

--by Thanissaro Bhikkhu (May 23, 2016)


Aprendiendo a No Tener Miedo de las Cosas que Son Reales.
--por Thanissaro Bhikkhu
Recientemente he estado leyendo una guía de campo sobre observación de la naturaleza. El autor, cuando era niño, fue enseñado por un anciano Nativo Americano. Un día el niño le preguntó al anciano, “¿Por qué no tienes miedo del calor ni del frío?
El anciano le miró por un momento y finalmente dijo, “Porque son reales.”
Y ese es nuestro trabajo como meditadores: tratar de aprender a no tener miedo de las cosas que son reales.
Básicamente, descubrimos que las cosas que son reales no plantean ningún peligro para la mente. Los peligros reales son las desilusiones, las cosas que inventamos, las cosas que utilizamos para tapar la realidad, las historias, las nociones preconcebidas que imponemos a las cosas. Cuando tratamos de vivir en esas historias y nociones, la realidad es amenazante. Siempre mostrando las grietas de nuestras ideas, las grietas de nuestra ignorancia, las grietas en nuestros deseos. Siempre y cuando nos identifiquemos con esos deseos de fantasía, la encontraremos amenazadora. Pero si aprendemos a ser personas reales nosotr@s mism@s, entonces la realidad no plantea ningún peligro.
Para eso es la meditación, para enseñarte a ti mism@ a ser real, para estar en contacto con lo que está sucediendo de verdad, para observar tu sensación de quién eres y desmontarla desde el punto de vista de lo que de verdad es, para mirar las cosas que encuentras amenazadoras en tu vida y ver qué son realmente. Cuando miras de verdad, ves la verdad. Si eres authentic@ en tu mirar, aparece la verdad.
Este es un principio importante en la práctica. […] Sólo la gente que es verdad puede ver la verdad. La verdad es una cualidad de la mente que no depende de resolver cosas o ser inteligente. Depende de tener integridad en tus actos y en tus poderes de observación, aceptando la verdad como es. Significa que aceptas el hecho de que tú juegas un papel en moldear esa verdad, así que tienes que ser responsable. Tienes que ser sensible tanto con lo que estás haciendo como con los resultados que consigues, de forma que puedes aprender a ser más y más hábil.
Preguntas semilla para la reflexión: ¿Qué significa para ti “llegar a ser gente real”? ¿Puedes compartir una experiencia personal de cuando fuiste capaz de contactar con lo que era real para ti? ¿Qué práctica te ayuda a ser auténtic@?

Sacado de la Charla Dhamma: Sé real de Thanissaro Bhikkhu's

Excerpted from Thanissaro Bhikkhu's Dhamma Talk: Get Real

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7 Previous Reflections:

 
On May 29, 2016 Caroline Blackwell wrote:

Recently, I went through the difficult experience of learning that I needed a breast biopsy. During the two weeks leading up the procedure, I was consumed with fear; I had a hard time concentrating, felt panicky, confused, out-of-control... I entertained lots of worst case imaginings.  The fear was real, but the stories I constructed of its energy were not.  After the biopsy, I sat with the radiologist and talked with her about what "really" would happen, from that point forward. I determined what I could do, what I would do...with real information; I faced down my fear-based imaginings and consolidated a more response-able, self-connected consciousness about the situation. A plan emerged that allowed me breathe in hope, clarity, and strength--no matter what.  Through this experience, I (re)learned several lessons and practices about being and keeping it "real."  They include the following: 1. Voice matters. The more I tried to "silence" my  See full.

Recently, I went through the difficult experience of learning that I needed a breast biopsy. During the two weeks leading up the procedure, I was consumed with fear; I had a hard time concentrating, felt panicky, confused, out-of-control... I entertained lots of worst case imaginings.  The fear was real, but the stories I constructed of its energy were not. 

After the biopsy, I sat with the radiologist and talked with her about what "really" would happen, from that point forward. I determined what I could do, what I would do...with real information; I faced down my fear-based imaginings and consolidated a more response-able, self-connected consciousness about the situation. A plan emerged that allowed me breathe in hope, clarity, and strength--no matter what. 

Through this experience, I (re)learned several lessons and practices about being and keeping it "real."  They include the following: 1. Voice matters. The more I tried to "silence" my fear with silence, the stronger it became. 2. Thoughts are things.  It sounds trite, but a vital portion of the way we inhabit our worlds is first constructed in our minds. Call it attitude; call it faith, call it what you will.  3. Love is power. If a quality of fear is disconnection from what is "real," an antidote to fear is love. Love has been defined as uniting that which appears separate; and as such, love is an act of courage in itself. 

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On May 26, 2016 dbracey wrote:

 I agree you do play a key vital role the truth. And in order to be truthful you have to practice.



On May 24, 2016 Alia wrote:

Beautifully said .. If you're true in your looking, the truth appears.

 
You can see the truth only by becoming that truth. And by becoming truth you are no longer divided and thus no more afraid. We have to learn how to look..  


1 reply: Aj | Post Your Reply
On May 23, 2016 Indira Iyer wrote:

 Most of what we "know" to be "real" is still continuously being proven wrong;whether it is science or our own perceptions, there are countless examples. We see the world as "we are" and not for "what it is" including other people and inanimate objects. Hence, putting a condition on fear based on our own faulty perception of what is real is still a question to me. What is real, is how we seem to perceive and experience (assuming we are not mystics who can see reality for what it is). Hence, if our notion of reality itself is constantly evolving why worry about what is real, hence why worry about fear at all. Accept fear when it arises, for within it lies truth of some experience that is about to unfold and reveal your truth, but do not buy into it- many of those emanate from our mind and are made of illusions and arise out of impermanence. When we accept the fact that it is ok to be fearful but not act out of it, we are forever free from the  See full.

 Most of what we "know" to be "real" is still continuously being proven wrong;whether it is science or our own perceptions, there are countless examples. We see the world as "we are" and not for "what it is" including other people and inanimate objects. Hence, putting a condition on fear based on our own faulty perception of what is real is still a question to me. What is real, is how we seem to perceive and experience (assuming we are not mystics who can see reality for what it is). Hence, if our notion of reality itself is constantly evolving why worry about what is real, hence why worry about fear at all. Accept fear when it arises, for within it lies truth of some experience that is about to unfold and reveal your truth, but do not buy into it- many of those emanate from our mind and are made of illusions and arise out of impermanence. When we accept the fact that it is ok to be fearful but not act out of it, we are forever free from the need to qualify what is real and what isn't.

 

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On May 22, 2016 david doane wrote:

In this life, all that is is temporary, constantly changing, and uncertain; we are different yet one; we are of this planet and not on it.  A big part of becoming real is to learn and accept those facts of life and live accordingly.  Real people don't fight, deny, or ignore the facts.  Real people may not be in harmony with everyone but are in harmony with life.  Real people see what is rather than seeing their own thinking, expectations, prejudices.  I am able to get in touch with what is real for me when I look inside to my own feelings, my own experience, my own intuition, and not just go along with what is said to be real.  What I am seeing or feeling is my truth.  What helps me is to accept and value my truth.  What also helps me is to be open, express my truth and listen to the response of others, which process modifies my position and I learn and grow.



On May 20, 2016 Jagdish P Dave wrote:

 Seeing ourselves as we are and seeing others as  they are is not that easy although it is liberating. We wear lenses of our desires, wants and biases to see ourselves and others.Our lenses need to be clean and clear to see the reality or the truth. The truth liberates us from the delusions, maya, we create within our own selves.It is like chasing the mirage. No wonder why we go through ups and downs in our life. Sitting quietly in a meditative way helps me to see things more clearly and dispels my delusion. I cause my own suffering by projecting my own wishes and desire and seeing things the way I want to. It has resulted in pain and agony. I attribute my suffering to the other person in my life with a blaming stance. What has helped me and still helps me is sitting still to listen to my unfiltered voice and seeing the truth. Such mindfulness processing frees me from my self-created bondage and makes me whole and wholesome. I always set aside time for awakening myself. This  See full.

 Seeing ourselves as we are and seeing others as  they are is not that easy although it is liberating. We wear lenses of our desires, wants and biases to see ourselves and others.Our lenses need to be clean and clear to see the reality or the truth. The truth liberates us from the delusions, maya, we create within our own selves.It is like chasing the mirage. No wonder why we go through ups and downs in our life. Sitting quietly in a meditative way helps me to see things more clearly and dispels my delusion.

I cause my own suffering by projecting my own wishes and desire and seeing things the way I want to. It has resulted in pain and agony. I attribute my suffering to the other person in my life with a blaming stance. What has helped me and still helps me is sitting still to listen to my unfiltered voice and seeing the truth. Such mindfulness processing frees me from my self-created bondage and makes me whole and wholesome. I always set aside time for awakening myself. This mindfulness meditation helps me to remain centered and grounded.

May we  all find some time everyday to be with ourselves mindfully to see the truth for awakening..

Namaste.

Jagdish P Dave


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