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The Delight in Exploring Inner Territory

--by Vimala Thakar (Feb 15, 2016)


As long as we cling to the idea that this is "my mind, my own, personal mind," we will have a strong tendency to look as good as possible. But if we observe the mind from a non-personal viewpoint, from the perspective from non-ownership, simply observe our minds and how they function, we will be less trapped by judgments.

To be attentive to the psychological structure, doesn't mean we must disappear somewhere and give up all relationships, responsibilities. The art is to stay within the movement of relationships, to continue with work, to be a responsible citizen, and to be attentive to the play of the mind. But we'll have to be very alert, for the mind is subtle, wily, full of tricks.

It's a tremendous thrill to see the beginnings of anger or jealousy or greed, not simply to be caught unawares when the emotion is full-blown and has us in its grasp, but to see the first tiny movements of emotion. Where does it spread, what does it do to our behavior? Just as there is joy in exploring an unknown wilderness, there is a delight in exploring the inner territory, in watching the volcanoes explode without any movement of defense, judgment, sense of ownership.

If we have never observed anger in ourselves from subtle beginnings to full explosion, we will always be caught in its force. We may try to suppress the behavior of anger, but still it will do its damage and we will not be free of it.

Attentiveness without any movement of the defense structure has its own intelligence. But the automatic tendency is to bring in defenses, judgments, and to move from observation to justification, evaluation. [...] All the explanations, justifications may be true, but they prevent direct perception of what it is that anger does to our bodies, to relationships, to the work we do.

If we defend any emotion, anger, fear, jealousy, we own it, we cling to it, and we accept a life in which emotional imbalances can wreak whatever havoc they like.

From "Spirituality and Social Action: A Holistic Approach"

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7 Previous Reflections:

 
On Feb 21, 2016 Yvonne wrote:

Only after looking in and then becoming aware of what I was defending...I reflect on the old wound and try to see what was the root -cause, and start working on what  must change about me.....usually it's about forgiveness... 



On Feb 21, 2016 vic smyth wrote:

 Whenever I notice anger in myself or others, I simply remind myself, "Hey, what should I expect, we all evolved from chimpanzees." Then the anger magically fizzles out. Our egos are a part of us. Fighting it is futile. Rather make a truce with it to help forge a happier, workable coexistence. 



On Feb 18, 2016 Sergio Galvan wrote:
It was a real treat to read the article. Deepak
Chopra, in several of his books, says: I use my brain, I do not let my brain use me". 
 

On Feb 16, 2016 Nisha wrote:

 Vimalajii was one of the most amazing modern teachers of our time. Thank you for this vignette!  Observing the mind, impersonally, not as the 'doer,' must be taught in schools. This education, of the self and Self, and experiencing the subtleties of the non-local mind, sets the pathway to fully realizing our true nature. Namaste.  Nisha



On Feb 16, 2016 Sunil,Bangalore wrote:

 Anger,Hatred,Greed all are connected with our EGO.Ego is preventive to the desired emotional & soul quotients.   But when I observed LOVE for all from beginning to full blown internally the experience is just delightful.Offer of selfless service out of gratitude may be the way forward generating love and affection.  



On Feb 13, 2016 david doane wrote:

Observing 'anger in ourselves from subtle beginnings to full explosions' means being mindful of the very beginning of anger and observing it through to its becoming full explosion.  I'm sure there aren't many people who do that -- it seems to me to be a sophisticated level of observation.  I was well into middle age before I began to do such observing.  The value of doing such observing is to be in control of the experience and what I do with it rather than it being in control of me and automatically moving into harmful behavior.  I can now sometimes notice the beginning of an emotion and make some decisions about what I want to do with it and how I want to express it -- I have and use it rather than it have and use me.  I value when I do that.  It costs me some spontaneity in the service of choosing my response, which I prefer in many situations.  The practice of being present and paying attention to process as it occurs helps me develop such attent  See full.

Observing 'anger in ourselves from subtle beginnings to full explosions' means being mindful of the very beginning of anger and observing it through to its becoming full explosion.  I'm sure there aren't many people who do that -- it seems to me to be a sophisticated level of observation.  I was well into middle age before I began to do such observing.  The value of doing such observing is to be in control of the experience and what I do with it rather than it being in control of me and automatically moving into harmful behavior.  I can now sometimes notice the beginning of an emotion and make some decisions about what I want to do with it and how I want to express it -- I have and use it rather than it have and use me.  I value when I do that.  It costs me some spontaneity in the service of choosing my response, which I prefer in many situations.  The practice of being present and paying attention to process as it occurs helps me develop such attentiveness, and constructive results help me delight in it.

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