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Pale Blue Dot, by Carl Sagan

FaceBook  On Jan 18, 2010 iJourney Editors wrote:

This excerpt from A Pale Blue Dot was inspired by an image taken, at Sagan's suggestion, by Voyager 1 on February 14, 1990. As the spacecraft left our planetary neighborhood for the fringes of the solar system, engineers turned it around for one last look at its home planet. Voyager 1 was about 6.4 billion kilometers (4 billion miles) away, and approximately 32 degrees above the ecliptic plane, when it captured this portrait of our world. Caught in the center of scattered light rays (a result of taking the picture so close to the Sun), Earth appears as a tiny point of light, a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size. 

 

Deciding What You Want to Keep, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

FaceBook  On Aug 24, 2009 Liz, ijourney Audio Editor wrote:

Prayer, spiritual study, meditation – these are all things that bring me closer to G-d, closer to myself, give me clarity and the ability to discern best actions (or non-actions) for myself and my family.  Then why do I fight it?  Why, sometimes are those books the heaviest to pick up?  Or those meetings or classes the most inconvenient to attend?  Or to sit quietly and claim my necessary daily bread seem such a daunting task?  As much as I love the mindfulness, strength and connection to my purpose and G-d that I feel afterward, why is it more natural for me to stay stuck in the murkiness and clutter of my own mind?  This struggle drives me to sit.  This ego battle pushes me to prayer.  Sometimes willfully, sometimes gritting my teeth, it is my choice no matter what.  Because I cannot afford to keep what is useless. 

 

Deciding What You Want to Keep, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

FaceBook  On Aug 24, 2009 Prasad, ijourney Photo Editor wrote:

  I travel alternate weeks. Sometimes, I travel within US or India but at least once a month, I am on long flight from one end of the world to another. Then I live in a hotel room or somebody’s house for a day or two and move again. I have reduced my baggage from two suitcases to one and now to carry on and a back pack. I leave some clothes in my parents house in India and some others in my house in California. Over time, I use less and less of what I have as possessions but miss them even less. I used to carry my computer, camera equipment and other stuff that I worked on for a while — in my backpack all the time. Now, I am able to walk out without any of them and while I still miss them once in a while, I can get along just fine. What the reading from Bhikku brought to my attention is that more I let go, more I free I am. Less I carry, less I need. I used to depend on my past, my credentials, my articles, tools, photos etc. etc. Over time, I am recognizing that it is really ‘baggage’ from the past. More I get attached to it, more I want become dependent on it. In that process, I lose. I lose the present moment. I lose relationships because I am so caught up in images, commitments, expectations and standards. Teaching awareness, I am lost in knowledge. Rarely aware. Rarely mindful being full of mind. Then it stuck me. I am aware now and empty of thoughts — no past, no future. NO Prasad, no others. Just being here. Just observing. No decisions to keep or take. No choice as well. Just aware. Did you experience it yourself? Tell me about what you are keeping and what you are deciding...  See full.

  I travel alternate weeks. Sometimes, I travel within US or India but at least once a month, I am on long flight from one end of the world to another. Then I live in a hotel room or somebody’s house for a day or two and move again. I have reduced my baggage from two suitcases to one and now to carry on and a back pack. I leave some clothes in my parents house in India and some others in my house in California. Over time, I use less and less of what I have as possessions but miss them even less. I used to carry my computer, camera equipment and other stuff that I worked on for a while — in my backpack all the time. Now, I am able to walk out without any of them and while I still miss them once in a while, I can get along just fine.
What the reading from Bhikku brought to my attention is that more I let go, more I free I am. Less I carry, less I need. I used to depend on my past, my credentials, my articles, tools, photos etc. etc. Over time, I am recognizing that it is really ‘baggage’ from the past. More I get attached to it, more I want become dependent on it. In that process, I lose. I lose the present moment. I lose relationships because I am so caught up in images, commitments, expectations and standards. Teaching awareness, I am lost in knowledge. Rarely aware. Rarely mindful being full of mind.
Then it stuck me. I am aware now and empty of thoughts — no past, no future. NO Prasad, no others. Just being here. Just observing. No decisions to keep or take. No choice as well. Just aware.

Did you experience it yourself? Tell me about what you are keeping and what you are deciding...

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One Legitimate Use of Power, by Keshavan Nair

FaceBook  On Aug 17, 2009 Prasad, iJourney Visual Editor wrote:

I read the book by Keshavan Nair and deeply touched by his call for a higher standard of leadership. Even though it was several over 10 years ago and Mr. Nair is no more, it is more relevant now than ever. When I saw this passage, I felt a sense of sadness. The idea of leadership and its connection to power is very critical to management thought. Somehow, as the author points out, higher leadership position means higher power. Interestingly, Gandhiji who held no position or great leaders from various traditions — like Jesus Christ, Lord Krishna did not influence people from a place of power but from a place of wisdom. In Hindu mythology, leadership actually begins at the heart chakra. It is about ‘anahata’ -- unstruck sound — no longer governed by cause and effect that makes leadership different and special from management. The lower three chakras represent three modes of management: Muladhara Chakra representing survival is about management through fear. Swadhistana Chakra representing pleasure and desire is about management through rewards and incentive. Manipura chakra representing greed is about management through power and control. They are Theory X, Theory Y and Theory Z in some form or another. But leadership is not about any of them so it is not connected with position, power, rewards or fear. It is about influence — getting people into the same flow that you are in or you getting into the same flow that they are in. it has nothing to do with role in the organization or community. In that respect, it is about tapping into personal power and tapping into power that is in others and igniting it. I feel that only leadership that matters is the higher standard of leadership where one practices what one preaches, has commitment to share what is felt in an appropriate and developmental way to people around him/her and has the courage to follow the path of the heart. In some respects that alignment of head, heart and hands is integ  See full.

I read the book by Keshavan Nair and deeply touched by his call for a higher standard of leadership. Even though it was several over 10 years ago and Mr. Nair is no more, it is more relevant now than ever. When I saw this passage, I felt a sense of sadness.

The idea of leadership and its connection to power is very critical to management thought. Somehow, as the author points out, higher leadership position means higher power. Interestingly, Gandhiji who held no position or great leaders from various traditions — like Jesus Christ, Lord Krishna did not influence people from a place of power but from a place of wisdom. In Hindu mythology, leadership actually begins at the heart chakra. It is about ‘anahata’ -- unstruck sound — no longer governed by cause and effect that makes leadership different and special from management. The lower three chakras represent three modes of management: Muladhara Chakra representing survival is about management through fear. Swadhistana Chakra representing pleasure and desire is about management through rewards and incentive. Manipura chakra representing greed is about management through power and control. They are Theory X, Theory Y and Theory Z in some form or another. But leadership is not about any of them so it is not connected with position, power, rewards or fear. It is about influence — getting people into the same flow that you are in or you getting into the same flow that they are in. it has nothing to do with role in the organization or community. In that respect, it is about tapping into personal power and tapping into power that is in others and igniting it.

I feel that only leadership that matters is the higher standard of leadership where one practices what one preaches, has commitment to share what is felt in an appropriate and developmental way to people around him/her and has the courage to follow the path of the heart. In some respects that alignment of head, heart and hands is integrity for me and integrity is the first and most important leadership step.

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What You Have Given Your Mind to Do, by Michael Singer

FaceBook  On Aug 3, 2009 Liz, iJourney Audio Editor wrote:

My thoughts get me into the most trouble.  It is this work, to refine my thoughts that has helped to refine my purpose in this world.  I am aware that I have to make a conscious choice about which thoughts I participate in and which I disengage from.  A rabbi once used a great analogy of computer pop-ups.  He said just like those inappropriate or deviant pop-ups that come across our computer screens, it is the same with the thoughts in our minds.  We can click on the pop-up and then go to that site and become immersed with that negative material -- sometimes we can't even get out!  Or, we can just push the delete key.  When those "pop-ups" come in to my mind, I have to choose to delete. Not go there.  Let it go.  This takes practice and I'm getting better at it.  I am much happier and less exhausted.  Just the awareness alone is such a miracle.

 

What You Have Given Your Mind to Do, by Michael Singer

FaceBook  On Aug 3, 2009 Prasad, iJourney Visual Editor wrote:

 There are two ways I mostly operate in life: Driving towards what I want and second, reacting to what happens to me. When I go for something and intentionally put all my energies into getting what I want, there is some excitement, passion and energy behind it. Unfortunately, at the end of the process — whether I achieve my goal or not — I experience a down cycle. On the other hand, when I react to what happens to me — both during my reaction and at the end of it, I am unhappy. Over time, my mind has taken over and plays games and I found both trying to control it or reacting to external circumstances does not give me sustainable happiness. 
Over time, just like the passage mentioned, I found a third way. doing things without any attachment to end results allowing things to happen and not react. While these two choices look very similar to my two drives, they are different in one subtle but important way. I am not attached to both and do what is appropriate in the moment and not carry either intentionality or reactivity with me. Whenever I am able to be ‘mindful’ and stay completely in the moment, whatever results showed up gave me much more happiness than my two drives.
The key still is to being with my mind — not controlling it, not giving up on it, not reacting to it nor getting caught up with it. It is just observing it, allowing it, that allows me in a paradoxical way to find peace with my mind and myself...

 

Like The Sun Shining, by Tenzin Palmo

FaceBook  On Jul 27, 2009 Liz, iJourney Audio Editor wrote:

Reading this passage I thought of raising my children.  To me, Like The Sun Shining represents total surrender of ego...letting go of even the tiniest crumbs of my will so that my children can grow and flourish into all of whom they were meant to be.  I've got the vision -- of myself being this big, bright, ever-burning sunshine for them and all who enter my life.  I pray that I can live this way when I get up from this chair and turn to plan the day with them.  I pray that I can maintain this vision as we gear up for another school year.  Sometimes it seems the line is blurred between what is my will vs. what is their path, but I do know how to tell the difference and this is good news.  I can tell the difference because of how I feel inside.  Prayer, journeling and my husband's feedback also help me get clarity.

 

Radiating Photons of Goodwill, by Marc Ian Barasch

FaceBook  On Jul 20, 2009 Liz, iJourney Audio Editor wrote:

I shared this piece with my husband.  He then said to me, “Sweetie, that is who you are.”  Funny -- I showed it to him because I thought it described who he is.  No matter where we go, I see him befriend and embrace perfect strangers and leave them humored, warmed, and ultimately, “changed.”  I want to be like him, like Nelson Mandela, Mother Theresa, a compassion monger.  So I work at it.  I awake each day with this goal in mind:  to embrace my husband, children, the grocer, the banker, even strangers in line with me.  Daily, I pray for G-d to remove from me every single character defect that would prevent me from radiating the goodness He put me here to spread.   I then ask that He fill me with what I need to do His will.  It is only through daily prayer, diligent work, learning and spiritual study that I can go out and hope to embrace every life I touch.  Every single life.

 

Radiating Photons of Goodwill, by Marc Ian Barasch

FaceBook  On Jul 20, 2009 Prasad, iJourney Visual Editor wrote:

Reflecting on the passage of Marc Barasch, I remembered the time I spent last night with the son of IIM Kozhikode director in their house. Siddharth is about 10 years old and is affectionate, friendly and smart boy who has real gift for listening to accents and languages. He and his parents came to Kozhikode from Singapore and getting adjusted to northern Kerala weather, schools, culture and people. He is one of those people who seem to be sending love vibes as Marc calls them. He completely un-self conscious, charming and was very comfortable to stay with his parents and us instead of going with his sister and my daughter to chat in some other room. The entire time he was sitting next to me, I felt I was in an altered state — as if he was embracing and accepting who I am and as if he is related to me from before.  He is truly a compassion monger and seems to bring out the best in others wherever he is.
He is not the only one I met who harvests kindness and spreads kindredness — the attendant in the guest house that I am staying in is another sage. He is so open hearted and caring towards us though he never met us before. It is as if my mother — I know the gender does not match but the love and open heart of my mother is what I experienced — was serving me and caring for me.

As I reflect, I realize that these compassion mongers or sages of goodwill are all around us. We have to just open our eyes and hearts to allow them to touch us, move us and inspire us. When we do, we go away with our hearts opened a bit more and spreading compassion a little wider than we would otherwise have.

Is it just me or you have similar experiences? Do you recall times when you started radiating photons of goodwill unconsciously because you got irradiated yourself?  
 

 

Elephant in the Rock, by Eknath Easwaran

FaceBook  On Jul 13, 2009 Prasad, iJourney Visual Editor wrote:

A lot went through my mind as I read the piece. I remembered recent conversations with a CEO of a large bank in India where he believed that his employees wanted to do what is right because they know goodness from inside out even though they don’t act on it because it is covered with assumptions, attitudes and negative experiences. I remembered a famous sculptor, I believe it is Michelangelo saying that the sculpture is already in the stone and his job was just to chisel out what does not belong. I also realized that my life’s work — igniting the genius within — is all about bringing the elephant in the rock to life. It is not about ‘tabula rasa’ approach — but unlearning and opening up to the essence inside. It also struck me that the philosophy that guides my photography is to keep zooming in till I compose a picture that consists of pure essence and nothing else. I also realized that I make others happy in relationships when I acknowledge and appreciate the divinity in them and not when I identify what is wrong and what could be improved. I just kept seeing so many threads of my life woven and connected to what Eknath Easwaran mentioned — we do not need to bring our higher self into existence. It is already there. My job is to get the rest out of the way so that I can operate out of my higher self. While I was writing this note, I got a phone call and my mood changed. For a while, I could not come back to my reflection. The higher self was pushed out by my emotions and had to wait for several hours before I could complete this note. Is my experience unique? I was very much in touch with my higher self and how did I allow myself to get caught in negative emotions? I first thought it was natural that it happens till I reread the last part of the passage: An incomparable spark of divinity is to be found in the heart of each human being, waiting to radiate love and wisdom everywhere, because that is its natur  See full.

A lot went through my mind as I read the piece. I remembered recent conversations with a CEO of a large bank in India where he believed that his employees wanted to do what is right because they know goodness from inside out even though they don’t act on it because it is covered with assumptions, attitudes and negative experiences. I remembered a famous sculptor, I believe it is Michelangelo saying that the sculpture is already in the stone and his job was just to chisel out what does not belong. I also realized that my life’s work — igniting the genius within — is all about bringing the elephant in the rock to life. It is not about ‘tabula rasa’ approach — but unlearning and opening up to the essence inside. It also struck me that the philosophy that guides my photography is to keep zooming in till I compose a picture that consists of pure essence and nothing else. I also realized that I make others happy in relationships when I acknowledge and appreciate the divinity in them and not when I identify what is wrong and what could be improved. I just kept seeing so many threads of my life woven and connected to what Eknath Easwaran mentioned — we do not need to bring our higher self into existence. It is already there. My job is to get the rest out of the way so that I can operate out of my higher self.

While I was writing this note, I got a phone call and my mood changed. For a while, I could not come back to my reflection. The higher self was pushed out by my emotions and had to wait for several hours before I could complete this note.

Is my experience unique? I was very much in touch with my higher self and how did I allow myself to get caught in negative emotions? I first thought it was natural that it happens till I reread the last part of the passage: An incomparable spark of divinity is to be found in the heart of each human being, waiting to radiate love and wisdom everywhere, because that is its nature.

What about you? How often are you in touch with the elephant in the rock? Who radiated love and wisdom for you allowing you to get in touch with your true nature? How do we keep it alive more often? Any ideas?
 

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Elephant in the Rock, by Eknath Easwaran

FaceBook  On Jul 13, 2009 Liz, iJourney Audio Editor wrote:

My goodness, what a beautiful piece!  This amazing story reflects my life work:  to keep chiseling away at the stone to expose, shape and ultimately be left with my true, highest self to radiate and impact the world.  “With an utter singleness of purpose,” I hold this vision for myself at the very moment that I write this reflection and for the rest of my life.

 

The Endurance to Observe, by Paul Fleischman

FaceBook  On Jul 6, 2009 Liz, iJourney Audio Editor wrote:
This passage made me thoughtful of two milestones I’ve achieved, by the grace of G-d:  awareness and surrender.  Once I become aware of my physical and emotional reaction to my feelings --drifting thoughts-- while meditating, I can acknowledge these and then choose what to do.  Surrendering all of my mental activity brings me closer to G-d, back to the here and now, to peace.
 
I also love Fleischman’s line that, “Dependence, loneliness, sensuality, exhaustion, hunger, petulance, perversion, miserliness, yearning and inflation are my old friends. I can greet them openly and warmly in people close to me, because I know them from the inside and therefore cannot condemn them without condemning myself.”   When reading this I felt my self-judgment and judgment of others melt away.  How wise, Fleischman suggests, to harness, ride and make useful that energy!
 

The Endurance to Observe, by Paul Fleischman

FaceBook  On Jul 6, 2009 Prasad, iJourney Visual Editor wrote:

Considering that I don’t sit regularly, I took several days to reflect on the passage and observe myself and others. I also found my ability to listen, see, pay attention are all connected to being here and now. That means no mental chatter, no expectations, no judgments but just being present. Being present without curiosity, without anticipation, without guilt or regret but being open. In that process, my mind disappears, ego gets out of the way, identity dissolves and what I say, do becomes a response to what I listened to, saw or observed. It is as if both are two sides of the same coin — as if we are interconnected. When my mind gets in the way, then there is an artificial separation and neither me nor the other is present — except the memories, regrets etc.
It takes effort to listen and observe without getting in the way. It happens infrequently and when I practice, it becomes more and more frequent.
Interestingly, everywhere I looked, the message to me was — practice, practice and practice. Let go of expectations from the practice and just practice for practice sake.
I am listening, I am listening, I — not sure -- am listening...
 

 

The Only True Voyage, by James P. Carse

FaceBook  On Jun 29, 2009 iJourney Content Editor wrote:

Great passage. Brought to mind three quotes. The first is about the fluid nature of journeys, as a metaphor for a way of be-ing and living:

  • "Once a journey is designed, equipped, and put in process, a new factor enters and takes over. A trip, a safari, an exploration, is an entity, different from all other journeys. It has personality, temperament, individuality, uniqueness. A journey is a person in itself; no two are alike. And all plans, safeguards, policing, and coercion are fruitless. We find after years of struggle that we do not take a trip; a trip takes us." -- John Steinbeck

The second relates to a subtle point Carse brings up regarding not overcoming distance, but rather discovering it. It reminds me of an interesting point I came across:

  • Distance is meant to relate, not separate. --Satish Kumar 

It is ultimately our uniqueness that allows us to uni-versally relate. And lastly, a quote I actually ran across in a plane:

  • The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes. -- Marcel Proust

And I guess to have new eyes is to continue to awake anew not just to the observed, but also to the observer!

 

The Only True Voyage, by James P. Carse

FaceBook  On Jun 29, 2009 Liz, iJourney Audio Editor wrote:

Throughout this passage I kept thinking about the transformation my children make when they are away at camp each summer.  They grow and change from new experiences, new relationships and adventure.  They get to travel out of their fears into bravery and learning how to depend on others to get their needs met.  During this time, I keep tilling my own garden within, as I prepare to ‘meet my children where they are’ when they return, meet them at the new place where they have ‘traveled to’ within.  I so look forward to reuniting with them with wonder, awe and surprise of who they will be.

 

The Only True Voyage, by James P. Carse

FaceBook  On Jun 29, 2009 Prasad, iJourney Visual Editor wrote:

 I had to read the passage many times before I became comfortable that I understood the message. Then, I put it aside to reflect and now, when I read it again, I wonder whether what I understood before is accurate any more. This is not the first time, I had difficulty understanding what is written or what is said. There is a time I listened to a commentary of 5 verses about 200 times for over 2 years. Every time I listened, I saw different things. I paid attention to some other element that I missed completely in the previous listening. When I mentioned that to my spouse, she said playfully that it applies to our relationship as well. We are married for over 26 years and I still discover something new regularly about my wife and about our relationship. It is not that the commentary, or the original text, or the message, or the person has changed. It is I who seem to be changing continuously. It is like the statement of Heraclites 3000 years ago — you can never step into the same river twice. You can never live the same experience twice. When I read the passage again, freshly, I realized that the journey or the voyage has not much to do with either distance or the travel. It has to do with openness, preparedness, beginner’s mind as Suzuki says. Without that openness, beginner’s mind, I can go around the world and still be stuck in the same rut. Wherever I go I get into same trouble. Whatever I am trying to avoid in one relationship shows up in every other relationship till I am ready to face myself and learn what I need to learn. Have you seen the movie Ground Hog Day? It is like that. I feel that in many areas of my life I am on autopilot — lights are on and nobody home. My body might travel thousands of miles every month — between India and US but my mind can stay stuck in the same belief system, same attitude and see no progress. So I read the passage again. I see hope. Can I really be in the garden and focus on the garden,  See full.

 I had to read the passage many times before I became comfortable that I understood the message. Then, I put it aside to reflect and now, when I read it again, I wonder whether what I understood before is accurate any more.
This is not the first time, I had difficulty understanding what is written or what is said. There is a time I listened to a commentary of 5 verses about 200 times for over 2 years. Every time I listened, I saw different things. I paid attention to some other element that I missed completely in the previous listening. When I mentioned that to my spouse, she said playfully that it applies to our relationship as well. We are married for over 26 years and I still discover something new regularly about my wife and about our relationship.
It is not that the commentary, or the original text, or the message, or the person has changed. It is I who seem to be changing continuously. It is like the statement of Heraclites 3000 years ago — you can never step into the same river twice. You can never live the same experience twice.
When I read the passage again, freshly, I realized that the journey or the voyage has not much to do with either distance or the travel. It has to do with openness, preparedness, beginner’s mind as Suzuki says.
Without that openness, beginner’s mind, I can go around the world and still be stuck in the same rut. Wherever I go I get into same trouble. Whatever I am trying to avoid in one relationship shows up in every other relationship till I am ready to face myself and learn what I need to learn.
Have you seen the movie Ground Hog Day? It is like that. I feel that in many areas of my life I am on autopilot — lights are on and nobody home. My body might travel thousands of miles every month — between India and US but my mind can stay stuck in the same belief system, same attitude and see no progress.
So I read the passage again. I see hope. Can I really be in the garden and focus on the garden, flowers, smells, beauty and timelessness? Can I take the focus off of me and on the beauty around me? Can I just be with the flower that is opening minute by minute, observe the butterflies make gentle, fragile and element patterns from one flower to another and lose myself?

Whenever it happens, the inner journey stops for me. I am no longer searching, finding anxiously, excitedly and frustrated that I have not found the ultimate answer. I stand still, quiet down and be with whatever I am with and forget everything including myself. I don’t necessarily grow by traditional definition but something develops inside me that allows me to let go one more belief that keeps me stuck.

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Walking the Razor's Edge, by Charlotte Joko Beck

FaceBook  On Jun 17, 2009 iJourney Content Editor wrote:

Experiencing nonverbally is powerful. I remember one instance when I was meditating through a painful experience. I was just watching it and it felt like what Joko Beck describes here as walking on that edge. Though certainly not with full equanimity, it was nonetheless experiencing the situation mostly nonverbally. Out of untrained instinct, I remember moving away from the pain (i.e. away from the razor’s edge), and immediately, the experience became verbal. It was almost as if I couldn’t verbalize while being on that edge.

An interesting quote I've heard says, “Pleasure puts you to sleep. Pain wakes you up. If you don’t want to suffer, don’t go to sleep.” That makes sense to me, but this only relates to the “pain” side of the coin: I think it is valuable to explore walking on the razor’s edge when you are experiencing the other side, “pleasure.” And to me, walking on that edge in that way is even more important, and it seems like the same pointers given in this thought apply to the domain of pleasurable states: pure, nonverbal experiencing, at the present-moment, non-dual edge of being.

 

Walking the Razor's Edge, by Charlotte Joko Beck

FaceBook  On Jun 17, 2009 Prasad, iJourney Editor wrote:

Reading what Joko Beck said, I wondered whether it is the same as being an observer and actor at the same time. It is about being with the pain, being with the experience and emotions that associate with the experience and also being an observer. Then who is the observer? If my experience is my life, then are my thoughts, feelings and observation different from experience? Is being on the razor’s edge ‘not choosing’ my experience vs. my being a witness? I found that experiencing without being attached to that experience, feeling without making it personal, thinking without feeling proud or happy or upset, allows me to merge myself into larger life and not be separate. When I am with something and also have the ability to not be with it is when the razor’s edge comes alive. Even the subtle ego, subtle ownership and actorship seem to make me separate myself from life, from experience.

Reflecting on the larger context of Zen vs. Hindu philosophy Vedanta, Zen is making the experience to be nothing. Vedanta is about making the experience and observation to be everything. One is emptiness and the other is everthingness or completeness. Same thought — two perspectives!"

 

Walking the Razor's Edge, by Charlotte Joko Beck

FaceBook  On Jun 17, 2009 Liz, iJourney Editor wrote:

While I’ve been taught to experience pain verbally, rather than stuff the feelings and implode, as I evolve in my understanding of myself, I am more able to be with pain (and pleasure and joy) nonverbally and to truly allow myself to be with those feelings inside me.  A great goal I seek is to strengthen my endurance to stay closer to the razor’s edge, to experience feelings of fear or being threatened nonverbally without seeking to verbalize which dissipates the experience.  On the joyful side of the coin, I frequently experience pleasure nonverbally with my children; this is truly an amazing experience to just be with this joy.

 

Be With the Storms, by Sri Sri Ravishankar

FaceBook  On May 19, 2009 Admin wrote:

Parijat, in many cases, we ourselves don't know the sources (or they don't exist online), but whenever we can, we do try to put a link.  This particular piece was sent in by a reader, Somik Raha; it was published by Times of India on 4 May 2009, in the "Speaking Tree" column, and is excerpted from a commentary on the Ashtavakra Gita.