Awakin.org

Waking up to Wisdom
In Stillness and Community

Previous Comments By 'raincountry0'

Living Lessons of Biomimicry, by Janine Benyus

FaceBook  On Mar 23, 2012 varsha wrote:

Namaste one and all and all in one.  ;)  This passage reminded me of different terms used to describe Nature-- life, love, ecology, interconnection, interdependence, biodiversity/species richness/true wealth (Nature's great university where all unique life forms/species live in harmony and unity).  I think of the word biomimicry as mimicking life (the process, the species, the way life works—ecology).  I have learned so much from Nature (and I feel our true nature mimics that, including how at Wednesday the Mehta/Metta family provides by allowing the abundance to spill forth and share, just how Nature does).  Nature (and children, too!) is the best teacher.  I feel humans as a species (one of the newest on the planet, in terms of the age of our planets and stars) have an ability to get in touch with the rest of life and evolve to a state of interdependence.  We just have been distracted or living life as if we were in a realm separate from the rest of life’s species (when in reality, our very existence is a receiving of the abundance of Nature—from the food we eat, the structures we live in, our clothing, etc.).  Nature inspires us to see us as simply one part in the web of all life.  We are not the controllers/dominators—we are subjects, just like other life forms.  We are a part of creation, but also can act as co-creators to live more equanimously/in homeostasis/balance with all life.  I remember times of walking through the Redwood forests, in awe of the trees’ ages, magnificent heights, and unconditional love/giving of shade, oxygen, and habitat to all life’s species.  I also know that there is a certain stillness that comes about when in these woods.  It allows me to step outside my “self”/shell and experience life more wholly/holy.  It is a crying reminder that spending time (especially alone) in the natural world is soo…important t  See full.

Namaste one and all and all in one.  ;)  This passage reminded me of different terms used to describe Nature-- life, love, ecology, interconnection, interdependence, biodiversity/species richness/true wealth (Nature's great university where all unique life forms/species live in harmony and unity).  I think of the word biomimicry as mimicking life (the process, the species, the way life works—ecology).  I have learned so much from Nature (and I feel our true nature mimics that, including how at Wednesday the Mehta/Metta family provides by allowing the abundance to spill forth and share, just how Nature does).  Nature (and children, too!) is the best teacher.  I feel humans as a species (one of the newest on the planet, in terms of the age of our planets and stars) have an ability to get in touch with the rest of life and evolve to a state of interdependence.  We just have been distracted or living life as if we were in a realm separate from the rest of life’s species (when in reality, our very existence is a receiving of the abundance of Nature—from the food we eat, the structures we live in, our clothing, etc.).  Nature inspires us to see us as simply one part in the web of all life.  We are not the controllers/dominators—we are subjects, just like other life forms.  We are a part of creation, but also can act as co-creators to live more equanimously/in homeostasis/balance with all life.  I remember times of walking through the Redwood forests, in awe of the trees’ ages, magnificent heights, and unconditional love/giving of shade, oxygen, and habitat to all life’s species.  I also know that there is a certain stillness that comes about when in these woods.  It allows me to step outside my “self”/shell and experience life more wholly/holy.  It is a crying reminder that spending time (especially alone) in the natural world is soo…important to our health/wellbeing, and hence, to all of life.  One way to mimic life is to become a part of it—the process.  If we see, from/by experience that our every breath, thought, emotion, and energy are part of the one wholeness, we would live more gently on the planet (I feel stillness—akin to the metamorphosis of caterpillars to butterflies and tadpoles to frogs) is key to this experience; it allows us to listen to what’s inside our hearts and expand our hearts to include all).  I see technology as a tool (can be used wisely or unwisely) and the inner technology of BEing and truly seeing/experiencing all as one merely allows us to really see that we are a part of the Earth (our bodies are of the Earth, and so we are pieces of Earth prouncing around in a certain form for some time-frame until there is change, which is the one thing that seems to remain constant in life).  As one of the latest/newest species, I hope we learn this from our elders/older species, and live in awareness.  I also feel blessed to have heard the author speak live, and it’s AWEsome to see all the cool examples of biomimicry that exist.  :)

Hide full comment.

 

Psychological Materialism, by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche

FaceBook  On Oct 20, 2011 varsha wrote:

This passage made me think of outer work and inner work, which often informs outer work and hence, is equally, if not more important.  There is a saying that "Work is an expression of who you are so who you are is what needs to be worked at."  I also read this poem that connects to this:Working Together We shape our selfto fit this worldand by the worldare shaped again.The visibleand the invisibleworking togetherin common cause,to producethe miraculous.I am thinking of the waythe intangible airpassed at speedround a shaped wingeasilyholds our weight.So may we, in this lifetrustto those elementswe have yet to seeor imagine,and look for the trueshape of our own selfby forming it wellto the greatintangibles about us.David Whyte(House of Belonging)  See full.

This passage made me think of outer work and inner work, which often informs outer work and hence, is equally, if not more important.  There is a saying that "Work is an expression of who you are so who you are is what needs to be worked at."  I also read this poem that connects to this:

Working Together

 We shape our self

to fit this world

and by the world

are shaped again.

The visible

and the invisible

working together

in common cause,

to produce

the miraculous.

I am thinking of the way

the intangible air

passed at speed

round a shaped wing

easily

holds our weight.

So may we, in this life

trust

to those elements

we have yet to see

or imagine,

and look for the true

shape of our own self

by forming it well

to the great

intangibles about us.

David Whyte

(House of Belonging)

Hide full comment.

 

Living With a Rebel Within, by Dzogchen Ponlop

FaceBook  On Sep 21, 2011 rachna wrote:

This passage reminded me of how we see our "selves" and our "stuff" (the "stuff" that's in our heads).  The awareness/intention is larger than the thought, emotion, action, etc.  How we are is equally, if not more important, than what we do.  I read this passage and thought of myself reading this passage (me as the reader, and me as the observer of the reader reading the reading).  :)  I'm sorry to miss coming to the gathering of inner-sights and shared reflections, esp. on a day that is regarded as Peace Day (http://peaceoneday.org/en/welcome)-- I know, it's a start as one day.  It's also a day to reflect on global truce/day of disarmament, but hypocritical in that a very probably innocent man is facing execution today (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troy_Davis_case   http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/beyond-prisons/the-locked-gate-standing-up-for-my-brother-on-death-row   http://www.yesmagazine.org/peace-justice/what-you-can-do-to-help-stop-the-execution-of-troy-davis   http://www.amnestyusa.org/news/press-releases/amnesty-international-condemns-decision-to-deny-troy-davis-clemency-calling-it-an-outrageous-affront).  May we all expand our hearts and minds to include all in love and compassion and forgiveness.

 

Practically Preposterous, by Pavithra Mehta

FaceBook  On Mar 16, 2011 Varsha wrote:

Thanks, Pavi.

Strangely (or should I say, serendipitously, as there may not be any coincidences), my Dad is currently reading the book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.  I didn't realize how deep it was.

When I read the first part, I took it literally-- a headstand?  And seeing things "upside-down" or from a different perspective.  I think this goes along with the creative solutions we all have-- working from a paradigm/framework and mindset that is different (as the same ones may not work with existing problems). 

And the before coming after reminded me of NOW, which is the ONLY time we really HAVE to actually live/experience. 

The notions of "can't", "won't", "don't" all are beliefs which when turned upside-down hold possibilities.  I think of us keeping on ?ing/searching/seeking, or simply BEing, and living from this possibility.

And the end reminded me of stillness and silence, which is one way of relishing the experience of NOW.

 

Making a New Start, by Patty De Llosa

FaceBook  On Jan 31, 2011 Varsha wrote:

Reading this made me remember:

"Perplexity is the beginning of knowledge."  --Kahlil Gibran

Not knowing something is a great freedom, because the innate curiosity can work and it's wonderful to find out something new through first-hand experience.

"Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end."  --Seneca

I also think of seeds and starts (baby plants that usually begin indoors, or in a greenhouse).  In order to make a new start in anything, one has to be vulnerable (uncertain) on some level.  For the seed to sprout, it needs the right atmosphere or conditions (sunlight, water, soil nutrients), but also needs love and care, which are the ingredients in life that come from the heart.  

 

Worms Are, Therefore I Am, by Satish Kumar

FaceBook  On Jan 19, 2011 Varsha wrote:

Two quotes come to mind after reading this, both by Chief Seattle:

"Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.”

"Earth does not belong to us; we belong to earth.”

 

Instilling Discipline and Responsibility in our Lives, by Angeles Arrien

FaceBook  On Jan 10, 2011 Varsha wrote:

Thanks for all your sharings.   Somik, I appreciate your online sharing, as it helped me feel I was there.  I am practicing being a silent witness (from here).  Could identify with what many shared.  Although the group I sat with shared different perspectives, I took away from the passage the terms discipline, responsibility, and capacity/capability, and what they really mean to each of us.  It is in the application of these in our lives that I feel makes a difference.   Discipline: self-control or regulation Responsibility: the ability to respond, our duty Capacity/Capability: how capable/able we are, our potential   I relate these with the heart.  In all, what we are able to hold within our hearts can reflect out in the world.  So, discipline (even though is usually regarded as individualistically) can also be a practice that many embody; a more universal responsibility that we carry can help make the world a better place, and how capable we are to achieve this is a result of our discipline/practice.  I related these with a story of the observation of the masses during the holiday season—more gentleness, generosity, giving (in different forms—financially, gifting, practicing giving—all charitable endeavors).  Talking about a steel-drum player I heard on the subway platform and witnessing people connecting to the music (even though he was not playing holiday-themed songs) made me think how we can connect/identify/relate to people we may not normally (I think one way is through individual spiritual practice).   In terms of the 3 do/don'ts, I couldn’t quite grasp the 2nd one, as when there is nothing to do (even though to some level—there is always something one can do), I would think people may just get lazy and twiddle their thumbs.    Our circle was questioning the context of this passage, in referring to land-based peoples.  Was this a term of r  See full.

Thanks for all your sharings.

 

Somik, I appreciate your online sharing, as it helped me feel I was there.  I am practicing being a silent witness (from here).  Could identify with what many shared.  Although the group I sat with shared different perspectives, I took away from the passage the terms discipline, responsibility, and capacity/capability, and what they really mean to each of us.  It is in the application of these in our lives that I feel makes a difference.

 

Discipline: self-control or regulation

Responsibility: the ability to respond, our duty

Capacity/Capability: how capable/able we are, our potential

 

I relate these with the heart.  In all, what we are able to hold within our hearts can reflect out in the world.  So, discipline (even though is usually regarded as individualistically) can also be a practice that many embody; a more universal responsibility that we carry can help make the world a better place, and how capable we are to achieve this is a result of our discipline/practice.  I related these with a story of the observation of the masses during the holiday season—more gentleness, generosity, giving (in different forms—financially, gifting, practicing giving—all charitable endeavors).  Talking about a steel-drum player I heard on the subway platform and witnessing people connecting to the music (even though he was not playing holiday-themed songs) made me think how we can connect/identify/relate to people we may not normally (I think one way is through individual spiritual practice).

 

In terms of the 3 do/don'ts, I couldn’t quite grasp the 2nd one, as when there is nothing to do (even though to some level—there is always something one can do), I would think people may just get lazy and twiddle their thumbs. 

 

Our circle was questioning the context of this passage, in referring to land-based peoples.  Was this a term of reference as opposed to sea-faring people or Native/Aboriginal/Indigenous peoples? I think some of us thought we should have read Thomas Cleary’s Zen Lessons as a passage instead—possibly a future reading?   

 

Hide full comment.

 

Ancient Law of Hospitality, by Thomas Berry

FaceBook  On Dec 17, 2010 Varsha wrote:

Catherine, you can learn more about the Free Farm here: http://thefreefarm.org/

 

Ancient Law of Hospitality, by Thomas Berry

FaceBook  On Dec 15, 2010 Varsha wrote:

@font-face { font-family: "Arial"; }@font-face { font-family: "Cambria"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }a:link, span.MsoHyperlink { color: blue; text-decoration: underline; }a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed { color: purple; text-decoration: underline; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; } Some links that came up from this week’s passage:   Cooperatives/co-ownership/co-housing http://www.shareable.net/blog/from-the-story-of-stuff-to-the-story-of-sharing-video-0   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_commons http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons   I think of open source and public domain versus private property and imminent domain.    The public trust, the commons are of, by, and for the local people.  I see local municipal decentralized self-government and home/self-rule as parts of the equations to freedom. http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/economics/laureates/2009/ostrom.html   http://www.celdf.org/article.php?id=536 http://www.celdf.org/section.php?id=42   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swadeshi_movement http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarvodaya   It seems like that is what non-governmental organizations and volunteer-based and community-led movements embody-- strong, decentralized development and reconstruction of society at the grassroots level (the bottom-up approach).   I feel honored and privileged to experience the ancient law of hospitality at the Mehta home on Wednesday evenings while I’ve been here.  I hope to exhibit the same hospitality when inviting friends and family over.    This reading connected a lot to http://www.ijourney.org/index.php?tid=724 for me, as I feel Nature is both Right (correct) and Bright (intelligence) in showing these principles and concepts of sharing the abundance or wealth with everyone.  Also, ecology and the interrelat  See full.

Some links that came up from this week’s passage:

 

Cooperatives/co-ownership/co-housing

http://www.shareable.net/blog/from-the-story-of-stuff-to-the-story-of-sharing-video-0

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_commons

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons

 

I think of open source and public domain versus private property and imminent domain. 

 

The public trust, the commons are of, by, and for the local people.  I see local municipal decentralized self-government and home/self-rule as parts of the equations to freedom.

http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/economics/laureates/2009/ostrom.html

 

http://www.celdf.org/article.php?id=536

http://www.celdf.org/section.php?id=42

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swadeshi_movement

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarvodaya

 

It seems like that is what non-governmental organizations and volunteer-based and community-led movements embody-- strong, decentralized development and reconstruction of society at the grassroots level (the bottom-up approach).

 

I feel honored and privileged to experience the ancient law of hospitality at the Mehta home on Wednesday evenings while I’ve been here.  I hope to exhibit the same hospitality when inviting friends and family over. 

 

This reading connected a lot to http://www.ijourney.org/index.php?tid=724 for me, as I feel Nature is both Right (correct) and Bright (intelligence) in showing these principles and concepts of sharing the abundance or wealth with everyone.  Also, ecology and the interrelationships and interdependence (food webs is an example) of life is apparent.  It reminded me of today at the Free Farm, where a man who did not seem to own much, came into the farm to check it out.  I think he connected to it later, and to some volunteers who listened to his story and shared with him about the place.  He was one of the last people to leave the farm!  : )  I think oases of nature in the midst of inner cities (AKA “concrete jungles”) are blessings to everyone, regardless of who they are.


"Hope is nature's way of enabling us to survive so that we can discover nature itself"

Hide full comment.

 

Stop Eating Our Corn!, by Akinori Kimura

FaceBook  On Nov 25, 2010 Varsha wrote:

"Hope is nature's way of enabling us to survive so that we can discover nature itself"

 

Stop Eating Our Corn!, by Akinori Kimura

FaceBook  On Nov 25, 2010 Varsha wrote:

@font-face { font-family: "Arial"; }@font-face { font-family: "Cambria"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }a:link, span.MsoHyperlink { color: blue; text-decoration: underline; }a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed { color: purple; text-decoration: underline; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; } Namaste one and all, and all in one.  : )  I appreciate and am grateful to Aunty and Uncle and the larger Mehta/Metta family for opening their homes and hosting Wednesdays worldwide.  And, I want to thank and acknowledge all the behind-the-scenes work and those involved in making Wednesdays happen in the spirit that they do.  They biomimic/model/display/exhibit the gifts and mysterious/serendipitous wisdom/intelligence of nature/the natural world/life as it is (all about sharing, giving/gifting the abundance and taking/doing what is needed, and balance—all haves, no have-nots—work like ecosystem processes and services/gifts).  I have seen the term biomimicry used to model technology/construction/design off of natural things and qualities, but the system itself (ways/laws of nature) can also be modeled.  If only our economic system modeled ecology, equity and the beneficial partnerships/interdependence of all, and we knew and understood the word “enough.”  This is true/real progress/development/reform.  Reminds me of the quote by R. Buckminster Fuller: “You never change things by fighting the existing reality.  To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”  And a quote by Albert Einstein: "A human being is a part of a whole, called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest... a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restr  See full.

Namaste one and all, and all in one.  : )  I appreciate and am grateful to Aunty and Uncle and the larger Mehta/Metta family for opening their homes and hosting Wednesdays worldwide.  And, I want to thank and acknowledge all the behind-the-scenes work and those involved in making Wednesdays happen in the spirit that they do.  They biomimic/model/display/exhibit the gifts and mysterious/serendipitous wisdom/intelligence of nature/the natural world/life as it is (all about sharing, giving/gifting the abundance and taking/doing what is needed, and balance—all haves, no have-nots—work like ecosystem processes and services/gifts).  I have seen the term biomimicry used to model technology/construction/design off of natural things and qualities, but the system itself (ways/laws of nature) can also be modeled.  If only our economic system modeled ecology, equity and the beneficial partnerships/interdependence of all, and we knew and understood the word “enough.”  This is true/real progress/development/reform.  Reminds me of the quote by R. Buckminster Fuller: “You never change things by fighting the existing reality.  To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”  And a quote by Albert Einstein: "A human being is a part of a whole, called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest... a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty."

 

This passage really resonated with me—perhaps, due to the environmental theme.  And although I’ve been termed a “nature person,” the truth is that we are it/the environment, and it/the environment is us.  We are a mere part/speck of the larger whole/scheme of things (world/planet, universe/cosmos, energy).  There is no distinction really between what is “outside” us and “inside” us (no “other”), in the ultimate reality of things, or the bigger picture (as seen/experienced by Indigenous people and enlightened beings).  Environmental health really equals environmental justice.  The health of us human beings is greatly dependent on the health of the environment at-large (environmental and human/public health are one and the same; they are so closely connected, they are inseparable).  As one of the newest/youngest species on the planet, it’s amazing that we’ve forgotten or have gotten so off-track with this, or think that this is mysterious (maybe we are not the most evolved?).

 

Learning to treat others (including other organisms/life forms—both animate and inanimate, and the ambient forces/elements), as part of us/ourselves (higher Self), is a lesson that I feel can make a world of difference.  We are all part of a whole.  I feel the Wednesdays experience is part of this (embodying and exhibiting that “sharing is caring,” “charity begins at home,” and “home is where the heart is.”).  I know that it is easier said than done, but it would address consumption/profit, power/domination/subjugation of, treating nature/natural things as subordinate/inferior, and exploitation of the earth (of each other—people, other life forms, the ambient forces/elements—in sum, the gifts the Earth/Mother Nature provides).  It is a challenge/opportunity we all face.

 

In addressing the ecology of regions and taking into account that the natural world (air, water, lands/foods) and its inhabitants (humans, animals, plants, fungi, and all other forms of being) have fundamental/inalienable/unalienable/inherent rights (as all have worth/value/price/cost—with these terms, it’s more than the association with a $ and market society), I believe we can start a global people’s movement where local citizens advocate for the rights of those without voices, or languages different from our own, who are seldom heard in society.

 

This passage addressed sustainable agriculture and development (and I associate this with local decentralized governments/self-organized cooperatives/healthy participatory communities and democracies), ecology—the dynamics and interrelationships/interdependence between species, organic (more than just the label/tag, but the inherent design/process of things—cradle-to-cradle, instead of cradle-to-grave manufacturing/production/economy) agriculture/agoecology/agroforestry/permaculture, the gift “economy” (nature’s way of handling things).  It reminded me of permaculturalist Bill Mollison (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Mollison), and Masanobu Fukuoka, a Japanese farmer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masanobu_Fukuoka), the do-nothing/natural farmer (letting nature take its natural course, as nature is both right/correct and bright/intelligent to model off of, and not interfere with). 

 

In a description of Alaska (a place I’ve lived and worked) by Sheila Metzner, she states: "I was born in the city- in Brooklyn, where I live now.  The world I grew up in is a constructed world, though very magical in its own way.  But in a place like this, there's a real connection with higher forces, whatever they may be.  It simplifies the concept of what's really important in life, what you value."  My experience in Alaska made me rethink the environmental crisis we are in (global in scope), because what we do to the environment we do to ourselves. 

 

The article also touched on corn.  I can go on at length about corn (“maiz” en Espanol/in Spanish; one of the most genetically-engineered crops) and its potential ecological and health risks.  It’s amazing (or should I say, “a-maiz-ing”—pun intended!  ;)  ) that the wise Indigenous people on the planet who have cultivated corn the traditional way for centuries, if not millennia, have preserved the biodiversity/multi-colored varieties (beautiful in sight, taste, and importance, among other properties).  And the more varieties/greater biodiversity, the ecologically stronger the environment (for evolution to take place, and in case of environmental disasters).  I really admire those who contribute to planetary health, human and non-human beings, stewards of the environment that provide the associated intellectual, social, and ethical groundwork for new solutions to global environmental/public health issues.

 

The article also touched on raccoon dogs, which reminded me of raccoons (a nocturnal mammal that many people fear, or consider as “pests”).  A woman I’ve noticed, in the city where I’m based, feeds both raccoons and stray cats (cat food from cans to both species, I think) to satiate them so that they don’t need to go rummaging in garbage cans around town near homes, and risk being attacked by humans, dogs or other beings.  I first thought that this was odd, but now see the reasoning behind this.  I also have come across raccoons at night while walking, and I can’t describe in words the experience making eye-contact connecting with them, and confronting the associated “fear” with this animal.

Hide full comment.

 

Mighty in Contradiction: Love Powerfully, by Patty De Llosa

FaceBook  On Nov 1, 2010 Varsha wrote:

The article made me think of the quote by Jimi Hendrix: “When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will be at peace.” I know there are songs about the Power of Love and giving love/give yourself (ego, identity) away. The circle of sharing included people sharing different opposites to the word love (which is truly unconditional, unbiased, and all encompassing/embracing/universal): hate, ambivalence, indifference, fear, judgment, partiality, antipathy (a strongly negative feeling, opposite of empathy/sympathy, acceptance—feeling for others, compassion in action), no love.  “Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and right doing, there is a field. I will meet you there.”  --Jalal ad-Din Rumi Love being without borders, lines, boundaries, walls and whole (greater than/transcends the sum of its parts) connects to a side project I have been thinking of pursuing (can share more in person with those interested). I think of the phrase: “may the force be with you” from Star Wars.  Imagine a worldwide movement, which I feel this is a part of, led proactively through/in love, and not all the defensive struggles that are occurring more commonly. Nipun touched on his assessment of the words: Power (ego) and force (selfless service, which anyone can tap into) and mentioned a book, called Power versus Force. It’s a great honor and privilege to meet with such brave and inspiring souls: “A coward is incapable of exhibiting love; it is the prerogative of the brave. “ --Mohandas K. Gandhi Neil mentioned some stories, including one about a child who is scared of the wicked witch and a caretaker reaching out to her at her level by giving her a glass of water to throw on the witch, for in case she would need it.  Bhoutik & Viral touched on Tough Love, in teen years (below age 20)…  ;) Tobias shared through visual imagery about a business model centered around love, w  See full.

The article made me think of the quote by Jimi Hendrix: “When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will be at peace.”

I know there are songs about the Power of Love and giving love/give yourself (ego, identity) away.

The circle of sharing included people sharing different opposites to the word love (which is truly unconditional, unbiased, and all encompassing/embracing/universal): hate, ambivalence, indifference, fear, judgment, partiality, antipathy (a strongly negative feeling, opposite of empathy/sympathy, acceptance—feeling for others, compassion in action), no love. 

“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and right doing, there is a field. I will meet you there.”  --Jalal ad-Din Rumi

Love being without borders, lines, boundaries, walls and whole (greater than/transcends the sum of its parts) connects to a side project I have been thinking of pursuing (can share more in person with those interested).

I think of the phrase: “may the force be with you” from Star Wars.  Imagine a worldwide movement, which I feel this is a part of, led proactively through/in love, and not all the defensive struggles that are occurring more commonly.

Nipun touched on his assessment of the words: Power (ego) and force (selfless service, which anyone can tap into) and mentioned a book, called Power versus Force.

It’s a great honor and privilege to meet with such brave and inspiring souls: “A coward is incapable of exhibiting love; it is the prerogative of the brave. “ --Mohandas K. Gandhi

Neil mentioned some stories, including one about a child who is scared of the wicked witch and a caretaker reaching out to her at her level by giving her a glass of water to throw on the witch, for in case she would need it. 

Bhoutik & Viral touched on Tough Love, in teen years (below age 20)…  ;)

Tobias shared through visual imagery about a business model centered around love, where love is the target/”bull’s eye” and with concentric circles around it, working for pay/to get paid to provide in the spirit of love for loved ones, and the outermost circle also being love.

The passage also reminded me of subverting the dominant paradigm and creating a new one: “Ultimately the creation of a new paradigm in the contemporary society is not about putting the right kind of people in power, but the right kind of power in people.”  --Michael Nagler

Relates to Einstein’s quote: “We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.”  An Image

One can reflect on this at times of election with fresh, new thinking, new ways of doing things, and working towards common/universal visions.

One person shared his experience on airplanes.  It reminded me of this clip, worth watching for a good laugh.

And a friend’s recent experience:

Hide full comment.

 

A Neuron with Imagination, by Francisco Ramos Stierle

FaceBook  On Sep 27, 2010 Varsha wrote:

Dear all,   I appreciate all your presence.  Namaste one and all, and all in one.  :)   There’s a saying about quotes: “I hate quotes.  Tell me something you know.”  But, I’m going to mention some quotes anyway.   Two come to mind (when at Wednesdays, both literally and figuratively, among other times):  “Charity begins at home” and “Home is where the heart is” and therefore, “Charity begins where the heart is.”  And, that sharing is caring.  Simple concepts, but essential to embodying being the change in the world we live.   Pancho’s passage seemed autobiographical, as his connections and network of community is vast and spread out, but, at the same time, tight.  His ability to relate and identify with all is admirable (regardless of labels and identifications, as we’re all living beings/earthlings).    I agree that the How-- process/effort/practice/means/methods/ways is more important than the What-- product/ends (each moment, how we choose to live it—with intention and purpose).  I think of children and their innocence, lack of walls/boundaries in saying, “Hi!” and smiling at “strangers,” those we don’t “know,” and sharing/lack of ownership in that there is no such thing as My or Mine.   I relate energy and emotions together—a different chemistry to feelings in our body.  The analogy of a neuron and emotions (building walls/bottling them in vs. emotional release/discharge, feeling them, expressing them, and letting them go).  It’s easier said when experienced—that our thoughts, words, deeds/acts, and being/energy are all manifestations of the same one energy (I know that this may sound a bit metaphysical, abstract, or Zen-like).  I admire what Pancho chooses to express: pleasant, fun, gentle, kind, compassionate, wis  See full.

Dear all,

 

I appreciate all your presence.  Namaste one and all, and all in one.  :)

 

There’s a saying about quotes: “I hate quotes.  Tell me something you know.”  But, I’m going to mention some quotes anyway.

 

Two come to mind (when at Wednesdays, both literally and figuratively, among other times):  “Charity begins at home” and “Home is where the heart is” and therefore, “Charity begins where the heart is.”  And, that sharing is caring.  Simple concepts, but essential to embodying being the change in the world we live.

 

Pancho’s passage seemed autobiographical, as his connections and network of community is vast and spread out, but, at the same time, tight.  His ability to relate and identify with all is admirable (regardless of labels and identifications, as we’re all living beings/earthlings). 

 

I agree that the How-- process/effort/practice/means/methods/ways is more important than the What-- product/ends (each moment, how we choose to live it—with intention and purpose).  I think of children and their innocence, lack of walls/boundaries in saying, “Hi!” and smiling at “strangers,” those we don’t “know,” and sharing/lack of ownership in that there is no such thing as My or Mine.

 

I relate energy and emotions together—a different chemistry to feelings in our body.  The analogy of a neuron and emotions (building walls/bottling them in vs. emotional release/discharge, feeling them, expressing them, and letting them go).  It’s easier said when experienced—that our thoughts, words, deeds/acts, and being/energy are all manifestations of the same one energy (I know that this may sound a bit metaphysical, abstract, or Zen-like).  I admire what Pancho chooses to express: pleasant, fun, gentle, kind, compassionate, wise. I feel that if we put our 100% into anything/whole being (body, mind, emotions, energy), that is true growth/progress/effort/success.  

I know Pancho has used this quote about being a “fierce mirror reflecting” and it describes some of the highest ideals.  I am moved by his insights, truth, and walking the talk of "being the change we wish to see in the world."

Hide full comment.