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Previous Comments By 'lavanya.marla'

The Way of the Water, by Ursula LeGuin

FaceBook  On Apr 6, 2017 LM wrote:

Beautiful piece. I thought Ursula LeGuin wrote stories and novels but reading this piece made me appreciate the depth in her perception. The connotation this portrays, of water taking the 'low road' makes me think of water being non-resistant, and being at a 'low energy' state. Offering resistance causes the body and mind to be in a 'high energy' state, where we are actively seeking ways to oppose the situation. Offering no resistance allows us to accept the situation for what it is, and seek another path. But water cannot be compressed, meaning that core values cannot be compromised in choosing an alternative path. By being both passive and yielding in action but being incompressible in core values, we can be like water, resilient and pliable, but achieving our final objectives. To me the way that helps me 'flow' is to deliberately pause and accept the situation in its entirety, watching the heat that arises in my body in opposition to a situation dissipate and simply look for alternatives. By nature, this is difficult for me to do, but much more internally unreactive (relaxing) when I see the change in the reaction within my own heart.

 

Restoring Balance and Meaning in Ourselves, by Alan Briskin

FaceBook  On Nov 11, 2016 LM wrote:

 Such a beautiful reflection to change the lens on my perspective. Reminds me of Swami Vivekananda's speech on 'microcosm' - the world within - and the 'macrocosm' - the world without. He said that the inner world of a person decides whether any blow from the outer world affects her/him. Similarly, I've also found that if I am not at peace or acceptance with myself, it becomes difficult to accept things in the outside world. Perhaps acceptance of the situation allows surrender, and then we may not be waiting for the synchronicity to happen, making us at peace with the outcome? 

 

Eulogy Versus Resume Virtues, by David Brooks

FaceBook  On May 26, 2015 LM wrote:

As someone at a real crossroads, this resonated deeply with me. I think that it is necessary to develop both kinds of virtues. However, I think the naming of these virtues should probably be head virtues (resume virtues) and heart virtues (eulogy virtues). The resume virtues help build a capability to perform the actions that the eulogy virtues call upon us to take up. Therefore, I believe that ideally, the 'leaders' are the eulogy virtues and the 'followers' are the resume virtues. I agree with David Brooks that reversing this order is what is happening in the world today, myself included. But I also agree that if we can align both of these, it would be ideal. But our current thinking (individual and collective) is not yet geared towards this. I also feel that naming certain virtues as eulogy virtues takes away, perhaps, from their importance, because we are not present during our eulogies. However, when we are practicing our eulogy virtues, I believe that our hearts get more connected. So maybe these are more of 'alive virtues' than  'eulogy virtues'?

 

Always Had It, Always Will, by Alan Cohen

FaceBook  On Dec 17, 2012 LM wrote:
With the internal (and external) disturbances I have been going through these past few weeks, I was thinking I would have nothing to say when I read this week's passage. All of a sudden, a couple of comments were added to a previous Awakin reading - 'A Whole New Dimension of Love' and I received a message because I had previously commented there. Out of curiosity, I re-read the article, the new comments, and some old ones - when I came across my own comment. Reading it suddenly gave me a new perspective, and not in an intellectual way. It opened my heart and lifted a burden off me, as if a good friend had sat next to me and listened with love. The part of that comment that resonated today: "...when we respect each other's journey and hold to to something within us and not outside us. Then we can truly let go. If we are truly happy and satisfied with what is within us (or our seeking is purely internal), then we interact with others to know their journeys, see parallels between our paths; and see how we can help them. Then, when we seek joy in our contributions to/sharing with others..."  While it does not immediately solve my problems, it gives me lightness of heart and some clarity. I do wonder, though, if I have digested it fully (or it would not have struck me so forcefully :) ) or if it would have been the same 'words of wisdom' that I would have said at any other point in time! 
 

A Whole New Dimension of Love, by Tenzin Palmo

FaceBook  On Jun 12, 2012 LM wrote:
The best example for holding 'holding lightly' that I can think of is when my father was teaching me how to ride a bicycle. As I was learning to balance while pedaling, he would hold on lightly to the carriage near the back wheel, but once I attained a bit of balance, he would let go. As he held on, I knew he would be there to break my fall if I fell, but he also would let go if I attained my balance. However, it is difficult when we simply conceptualize it or idealize it, for then we begin to hold it tightly, as Conrad points out. Then we begin to want to possess others who have the same ideals. While have the right companionship is important as we proceed on the journey, we should remember that each soul has its own journey. Seems to me like the only way is when we respect each other's journey and hold to to something within us and not outside us. Then we can truly let go. If we are truly happy and satisfied with what is within us (or our seeking is purely internal), then we interact with others to know their journeys, see parallels betwen our paths; and see how we can help them. Then, when we seek joy in our contributions to/sharing with others, perhaps, we will also stop being cold and indifferent.
 

Science As Spiritual Practice, by Adam Frank

FaceBook  On Apr 7, 2012 L wrote:
Very nicely said. There are a few differences in these two paths, however. Science can be absolute, and tested by empirical fact. Whereas life cannot be tested repeatedly because it is the 'truth' for each individual person. Moreover, it is only myopically that one can make decisions in life, whereas scientific truths are again different.

I am at the stage where I am making an inquiry about myself, triggered by an event. Because I did not think about this question deeply enough earlier, now am in a position that I now am realizing several things that were hidden before. It is surprising, a little bit disappointing, but mostly interesting and empowering. I am also not sure for how long I will be able to stay in the curious and inquiring (scientific) frame of mind, so I will also have to observe if this will cause negative feelings later.
 

Making Friends with the Present Moment, by Alan Zulch

FaceBook  On Mar 9, 2012 LM wrote:
A few days ago I had a similar insight - that all that really exists is only the present moment. And that was the only guarantee ever. I had read about this multiple times before, but this was the first time I felt it in a very real, alive and visceral way.

This insight also showed me that thinking about the past can resulting in 'analysis in hindsight' and thinking about the future in trying to project the past to the future. Both of which make me lose trust in life and God and feel insecure. So the only way is to decide to be happy right now.

These seem rather simple, but somehow since having this insight, life has changed. Not completely, but bit by bit. Somehow the bonds to the past seem slightly looser. One way I think of this when I forget is the analogy of a line on a blackboard. My life is currently a dot on that line, and I consciously erase the length of line before that. This helps.
 

Giving Somebody Your Heart, by Anonymous

FaceBook  On Oct 17, 2011 L wrote:

I was very moved by this one. Recently I came to a sudden and powerful realization that the heart, rather than the mind, is the seat of depth in all interaction - whether personal or professional. While I am still trying to grasp the implications of this, the only way to practice this, it seems, is through truth. By being completely true, and by loving that truth more than anything else, we free ourselves from expectation and unfulfillment. In fact, the ring of truth is enough to silence the ego,which recognizes that the truth is so much more profound. This was especially highlighted by two incidents. When I met a friend who shared his presence so completely, even though we had met for the first time, I felt immensely grateful for helping me be in that space and made me realize the power of truth. Though our conversation was about very simple things, it simply gave everyone space to be honest. The second incident was when I was reading a book - 'Infinite Vision' - about the heart driving the mind and hands, resulting in an unusual service and a powerful work culture. The same thought of the heart being the fuel for everything else came to me. Thrice in one week - now, that is a message...

 

Embracing the Mystery of Uncertainty, by Alan Briskin

FaceBook  On Dec 31, 2010 Lavanya wrote:

Reading this parable reminded me of the following quote by Swami Vivekananda:   "The more we grow in love and virtue and holiness, the more we see love and virtue and holiness outside. Adjust the microcosm (which is in your power to do) and the macrocosm will adjust itself for you."   It is beautiful that the way to inner growth and healing is through outward action - action that does not focus on the rift within, but on healing outside. When we stop (selfishly) focusing on ourselves and give whatever we can as a gift to the world, we find ourselves healed from within. And the inner growth further reflects outward, in the 'adjustment' of the macrocosm!   Thanks for sharing!  See full.

Reading this parable reminded me of the following quote by Swami Vivekananda:

 

"The more we grow in love and virtue and holiness, the more we see love and virtue and holiness outside. Adjust the microcosm (which is in your power to do) and the macrocosm will adjust itself for you."

 

It is beautiful that the way to inner growth and healing is through outward action - action that does not focus on the rift within, but on healing outside. When we stop (selfishly) focusing on ourselves and give whatever we can as a gift to the world, we find ourselves healed from within. And the inner growth further reflects outward, in the 'adjustment' of the macrocosm!

 

Thanks for sharing!

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