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Previous Comments By 'jonmadian'

Sincerely Enthusiastic, by Gretchen Rubin

FaceBook  On Feb 17, 2015 jon madian wrote:

Nipun, this is an interesting little essay... thank you  :)) What the author may miss is that if we feel a lack of power,  being critical can be a compensation a kind of narcissistic self-inflation...   enthusiasm,  to be filled with the spirit, is, happily, the opposite of being critical   to see the beauty, the goodness, to be optimistic may requires that we have the capacity  to be vulnerable and also to transcend  our vulnerability...    I "think"...   See full.

Nipun,

this is an interesting little essay... thank you  :))
What the author may miss is that if we feel a lack of power, 
being critical can be a compensation
a kind of narcissistic self-inflation...
 
enthusiasm, 
to be filled with the spirit,
is, happily, the opposite of being critical
 
to see the beauty, the goodness,
to be optimistic may
requires that we have the capacity 
to be vulnerable and also to transcend 
our vulnerability... 
 
I "think"... 

Hide full comment.

 

Aliveness and Harmony, by Christopher Alexander

FaceBook  On Jan 3, 2014 Jon Madian wrote:

my wife's comment: nice piece but could've been written gender free  :))) 

 

Meditate Like Christ, by Krishna Das

FaceBook  On Dec 10, 2013 jon madian wrote:

 Joe, truly I agree with the "one way" if it involves love, compassion, non-judgment of self and others, witnessing (mindfulness) and so on, for that one way is the way of many wisdom traditions. Jesus is in me as doorway, as is the beauty of nature, Buddha, and those who share the journey of love and loss with me. Wishing you well, and apologies for NOT quite joining your camp. 

 

Meditate Like Christ, by Krishna Das

FaceBook  On Dec 10, 2013 jon madian wrote:

 Folks, I'm afraid this conversation is polarized in ways that can not lead to new, life affirming insights on either side, so I thank the open-minded who welcome a diversity of perspectives and wish others well. At least we all agree on the value of pursuing a spiritual path and I assume this includes loving and not judging others--a challenging task indeed. 

 

Meditate Like Christ, by Krishna Das

FaceBook  On Dec 8, 2013 jon madian wrote:

Meg is there room for different people and different religions to have different views on this or is there one truth only? If so, how do you know this truth is the one truth? Why isn't there room for different beliefs based on different spiritual traditions? How can you be so sure that what you believe is the one true belief?

 

Meditate Like Christ, by Krishna Das

FaceBook  On Dec 8, 2013 jon madian wrote:

 Is there anything in the universe that is NOT God if one is receptive to perceiving through the eye of empathy and love?

 

Meditate Like Christ, by Krishna Das

FaceBook  On Dec 8, 2013 jon madian wrote:

 What is blasphemy? And what is blasphemy?

 

Meditate Like Christ, by Krishna Das

FaceBook  On Dec 7, 2013 jon madian wrote:

 I wonder if we are to "wait... for The One and Only...JESUS? Or are we to seek to develop ourselves in ways that reveal the Jesus in all of us? My hunch is that waiting for JESUS will be much less productive than "seeking what he sought" and thus evolving ourselves so we manifest more and more of the principles his life either embodied or has come to embody.  

 

Meditate Like Christ, by Krishna Das

FaceBook  On Sep 23, 2013 Jon Madian wrote:

Yes, it could well be that Jesus was influenced by Indian spiritual traditions, and it also seems equally likely that he may have gained all he needed from Hebrew mystical traditions. Or, like many mystics, he may have been born  destined to know the heart and soul of love. 

 

Meditate Like Christ, by Krishna Das

FaceBook  On Sep 21, 2013 Jon Madian wrote:

 agreed; it amazes me how tears emerge in great moments of deepest, most caring joy.

 

Meditate Like Christ, by Krishna Das

FaceBook  On Sep 13, 2013 jon madian wrote:

 What's most meaningful, beautiful, and scary to me is the tear. Itt unites transcendence with empathy, cosmic love with individual suffering, bliss with grief. What a beautiful expression. 

 

Emotions for Liberation, by Sally Kempton

FaceBook  On Jul 31, 2013 Jon Madian wrote:

 yes, beautifully put, the question is 'how we get there' (to an attitude that can support reconciliation).
The other point is accepting the other emotions we must deal with on our path to getting there, or accepting where we may fall short.... 

 

Emotions for Liberation, by Sally Kempton

FaceBook  On Jul 31, 2013 jon madian wrote:

The ideas that our suffering is always our own fault seems like a half-truth, like all truths. Many innocent people are caught up in genocide, friendly fire, and a million other circumstances outside of their making or control. What could be sadder than a starving mother who cannot feed her crying, dying child! Actually many things are just as sad and happening every moment of every day. We need to avoid overly simplistic, transcendent ideas that often don't apply. Yes, a great deal of our suffering is self-inflicted and a great deal of it is not.

 

Emotions for Liberation, by Sally Kempton

FaceBook  On Jul 25, 2013 Jon Madian wrote:

I wonder how else the guru might have chosen to communicate? While the ability to easily express all emotions, including anger, is a positive, isn't the ability to chose what a person wants to express and to model  just as important. Will the cook go home and feel righteous in expressing his anger at his wife or child? Yes, to the freedom to feel and express emotions, but ? ? ?

 

A Deep, Uncritical Love, by Bhante Gunaratana

FaceBook  On Mar 23, 2011 jon madian wrote:

The openning statement: "You can't make radical changes in the pattern of your life until you begin to see yourself exactly as you are now." seems spot on. The challenge is that the "now" is the ever emerging present, which keeps appearing to change as we respond to the events within and outside of us. So this self-observation, or witnessing in a non-judgmental way, requires that we not identify with our thoughts and emotions even as we embrace them. A subtle dance where the music is stillness, concentration, and empathy.

 

A Deep, Uncritical Love, by Bhante Gunaratana

FaceBook  On Mar 22, 2011 jon madian wrote:

I loved this piece until I came to the "meditation" part. As one who began to practice "meditation" many decades ago, my concern with the word "meditation" is that it can mean so many things that are NOT what is intended.

The premise that we must cultivate self-awareness in all situations, be aware of our afflicted states and take responsibility for them is clear to me. Sitting quietly and breathing into self-awareness, or being engaged with others and staying self-aware with the help of breath, seems more useful than the abstract idea of meditation. This work of self-awareness is very humble, very simple. It is giving attention to thought and feeling and investigating and releasing those states of consciousness that are not constructive, that are judgmental and hurtful because they are born of hurt and fear. So often grief is a doorway to love and living fully with awareness is the meditation.

 

Space in the Crowded Workplace, by Ashvin Iyengar

FaceBook  On Aug 2, 2010 jon madian wrote:

Purely beautiful... thank you again and again

 

Each of Us, a Miniature Wholeness, by Vimala Thakar

FaceBook  On Jul 22, 2008 Jon wrote:
so deeply true it seems like perhaps we are on the cusp of something new of knowing that what we take for privacy with all its games of shame and gain is actually the music written by our collective mind coming to recognize what we take for the most personal may be the most deeply instinctive shared through endless strands of DNA woven on our looms of life looms of mind embodied each of us an individual joined in the collective om-shalom, jon