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Previous Comments By 'eric'

Three Qualities Of Holiness, by Anthony De Mello

FaceBook  On Mar 12, 2019 Eric Hutchins wrote:

After expressing the thanks and respect these well intentioned words and their author deserve, may I be frank? My response is summarized by the aphorism: "Not for lack of flowery words is the world plunged into suffering." These are flowery words that may inspire the surface minds of readers, but such inspiration is a mood that quickly passes. I read a lot of such words and wonder why so many believe in the power of flowery words to end our suffering, bring us closer to the state of Yoga/Union, etc.? If the goal is this state of mind (Yoga, Enlightenment, Divine Union, etc.), why not say whatever needs to be said to inspire the reader to take the most direct path (or, for those who believe there is no "most direct path," ANY well-established and proven path)? Flowery words are not any of these paths. They are, at best, "inspiration with no clear guidance" and, at worst, "entertainment" (as in "further distraction") for those who are stilllost. This may sound overly harsh to some. However, I say this to those of us whose state of mind is such that such words come unsought (i.e. as a natural expression of divine consciousness: reader attention is a precious and fleeting phenomenon. Where we direct the attention of others can change their lives or mire them deeper in illusion. Whichare flowery words likeliest to do for the vast majority of readers? This is my point. Those of us who are fortunate enough to have been called to a direct path are also called to pay that gift forward. Weaving a perplexing tapestry of words is not paying the gift of our salvation forward. I declare that atechnique of self-transcending introspection (raja yoga) that has proven itself safe and effective over scores of generation isthe most direct path for both the religious and hte nonreligious. It soon light the thirst for knowledge (jnana yoga), devotion (bakti yoga), and right action in the field of action (karma yoga). This is the direct, P  See full.

After expressing the thanks and respect these well intentioned words and their author deserve, may I be frank? My response is summarized by the aphorism: "Not for lack of flowery words is the world plunged into suffering." These are flowery words that may inspire the surface minds of readers, but such inspiration is a mood that quickly passes. I read a lot of such words and wonder why so many believe in the power of flowery words to end our suffering, bring us closer to the state of Yoga/Union, etc.? If the goal is this state of mind (Yoga, Enlightenment, Divine Union, etc.), why not say whatever needs to be said to inspire the reader to take the most direct path (or, for those who believe there is no "most direct path," ANY well-established and proven path)? Flowery words are not any of these paths. They are, at best, "inspiration with no clear guidance" and, at worst, "entertainment" (as in "further distraction") for those who are stilllost. This may sound overly harsh to some. However, I say this to those of us whose state of mind is such that such words come unsought (i.e. as a natural expression of divine consciousness: reader attention is a precious and fleeting phenomenon. Where we direct the attention of others can change their lives or mire them deeper in illusion. Whichare flowery words likeliest to do for the vast majority of readers? This is my point. Those of us who are fortunate enough to have been called to a direct path are also called to pay that gift forward. Weaving a perplexing tapestry of words is not paying the gift of our salvation forward. I declare that atechnique of self-transcending introspection (raja yoga) that has proven itself safe and effective over scores of generation isthe most direct path for both the religious and hte nonreligious. It soon light the thirst for knowledge (jnana yoga), devotion (bakti yoga), and right action in the field of action (karma yoga). This is the direct, PROVEN path to Enlightenment, particularly Enlightenment across all cultures. Flowery and perplexing words may flow through us as a result of progress on this path. However, again and in closing, such words are not the path, for the vast majority, they are wasted opportunity that could be much better spent with eyes closed and attention freed to move inward in the direction of every greater charm and liberation. Jai Guru Dev.

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Green Mountains Are Forever Walking, by Subhana Barzaghi

FaceBook  On Jan 22, 2019 Eric Hutchins wrote:
 I am grateful for the opportunity to comment on the "one-word-rapid-enligtenment" model contained in the essay "Green Mountains Are Always Walking" essay. I undertand that many in the Buddhist community (and perhaps elsewhere) value this teaching. However, as a pactitioner of a traditional Vedic form of meditation for over five decades, I find it hard to imagine except as a rarety under very cloistered conditions. This leads me to wonder: why is it disussed so often?

It seems to me that it may be inspiring to the already inspired. But, does it enlarge the community or merely intrigue those seeking "entertainment with a spiritual flavor?" Given the rarety of this phenomenon, it appears too well-aligned with the dominant theme of "instant gratification" in our global materialist society. If so, is it merely a "unicorn?" Is it a "fishing hook" to intrigue others into taking the first step in what will very likely be a lengthy journey to "prepare" for the final "one word" step? If so, is this wise and right action?
 

Absurd Heroism, by Margaret Wheatley

FaceBook  On Jan 26, 2016 Eric Hutchins wrote:

I found this well-reasoned piece of common sense consistent with ancient scripture. Unfortunately, I commented at length and went on to defend Margaret's piece on the Kosmos Forum. This text area did no allow it to be cut and pasted from there to here. So, anyone wishing to read both comments, please go to:

http://www.kosmosjournal.org/news/absurd-heroism/   

 

Nothing Else Matters, by Scott Morrison

FaceBook  On Apr 15, 2014 Eric wrote:

 I think our nature is to be the exact opposite of this based upon the simple fact of evolution:  surviving no matter what:  war-like if necessary, dishonest if it gets us what we need to survive (or even to be happy for just a moment), and all that goes with that.  From Neanderthal to Kings to Silicon Valley, it never ends.

The second part of this:  it's my belief that those of us who can turn this inside out for extended periods of time and actually be unconditionally kind, honest, wise...without reservation...are the lucky few.

It would be a wonderful thing to achieve.