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Previous Comments By 'conp92'

Full Effort is Full Victory, by Eknath Easwaran

FaceBook  On May 7, 2011 Conrad wrote:

Eknath’s article was inspiring. It reminded me of  Buddha and Christ.
My young grandchildren are most on my mind. They are happy and peaceful as I want them to be. I often think how great it will be when I am with them.
My most persistent and sincere efforts seemed to be to understand everything and everyone. I am still mostly intellectual about most matters, yet deep down I know there is much more to healthy, peaceful living than intellectually understanding everything and everyone. I have come to understand that I do not understand, as I have come to accept uncertainty. Part of my problem remains that I want to be certain of my uncertainty.
I'm very impressed with William Penn's notion that "we will pass this way but once, and any good, therefore, that we may do, or any kindness that we may show, to any human being, let us do it now. Let us not defer nor neglected for we shall not pass this way again." I say that to myself every couple of days but I do not often practice it , nor do I practice the St. Francis of Assisi prayer which I also love.
It seemed that Gandhi practiced what St. Francis said: "Preach the gospel always – – use words if necessary." The gospel, as I understand it, preaches for us to be compassionate and kind to others and oneself.  I have 50 or 60 more paragraphs to say about this but I don't like to read long responses. These 50 or 60 more pages are part of my delusion of grandeur which Gandhi did not have. I say I would like to be no one, going nowhere, but I seem to enjoy the attention others give me when I say that. Thanks Viral and Nipun again for giving me the opportunity to say what I think and feel. You all have my gratitude. Warm and kind regards to everyone.

 

The Test for Meditation in Action, by Shinzen Young

FaceBook  On Apr 30, 2011 Conrad wrote:

Thank you so much. This is excellent. I learned much from it. I notice that I am still too much of a self. I  am more inspired now to grow up. I am most a non-self  when I am mindful and kind.
 As Seng-Ts'an said: "The more you think and talk, the more you lose the way." That fits well with the monk Thomas Keating, who said: "God's first language is silence. All else is a poor translation."Warm and kind regards to all readers. You all have my gratitude.

 

Noticing the Gaps, by Eckhart Tolle

FaceBook  On Jan 12, 2010 Conrad wrote:

This is exactly what I needed to read.  I'm attempting to show my ego almost all the time in an unaware manner.  After reading what you sent, I am more aware of it. After several years, I continue to be inspired and enlightened by what you send.  You have my gratitude.  Warm and kind regards.  Conrad

 

Are You Ready To Lose Your World?, by Adyashanti

FaceBook  On Oct 6, 2009 Conrad wrote:

Once again, what you send is highly inspiring and enlightening.  I frequently forget what is said here when I think I have some truth that others ought to hear.  I am presently writing a novel about a student bringing legal action against a professor  for mentioning some ideas similar to what Adyashanti said. I seem to be implying that it is more true to be open than closeed. I will probably keep pursuing this but I am a little more cautious now as I am more aware that I know that I don't know.  Thanks for continuing to inspire me.  You continue to have my gratitude.

Conrad

 

Radiating Photons of Goodwill, by Marc Ian Barasch

FaceBook  On Jul 21, 2009 Conrad wrote:

Thanks much. This is so great I sent it to twelve people.  You have my gratitude.

 

 

Be With the Storms, by Sri Sri Ravishankar

FaceBook  On May 19, 2009 Conrad wrote:

Unusually fine. It is being yourself and acceoting yourself which is no separate self. All readers continue to have our gratitude.

 

 

 

On Good and Evil, by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

FaceBook  On Apr 29, 2009 Conrad wrote:

Thanks Nipun,

I continue to be inspired by what you send.

You have my gratitude

Conrad

 

Give Your Story As An Offering, by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

FaceBook  On Dec 12, 2008 Conrad P.Pritscher wrote:
I'm reminded of Layman Hsiang saying.: Attainment gains nothing. Loss losses nothing . Uncertaintyheps me not know in an intellectual way. I continue to be inspired by these messages you send and I often share them with others. You have my gratiyude.
 

Showing Up For Life, by Author Unknown

FaceBook  On Sep 2, 2008 Conrad wrote:
Thanks you Nipun. You continue to inspire me.
 

Time Shifting vs Time Management, by Stephan Rechtschaffen

FaceBook  On Aug 16, 2008 Conrad wrote:
Thanks much Nipun. Just what I needed today. You have my gratitude.
 

Living With Radical Honesty, by Brad Blanton

FaceBook  On Jul 29, 2008 Conrad wrote:
"I told a hundred fibs today and that's the truth." Seriously, this is great. I need to be reminded of this very often. Thanks for the continued inspiration and peaceful noticings.
 

Rebel For A Good Cause, by Sharon Salzberg

FaceBook  On Jul 1, 2008 Conrad wrote:
This comment is inspiring as was your recent comment from Theodore Rubin:s "Kindness is more important than wisdom." He also added something like, and realizing this is the beginning of wisdom. Thanks Nipun for making these available.
 

We Are Never Alone, by Anandmurti Gurumaa

FaceBook  On Jun 24, 2008 Conrad wrote:
Thanks Nipun, I feel connected to you. With much gratitude.
 

Love Your Path, by Paolo Coelho

FaceBook  On May 27, 2008 Conrad wrote:
What you sne dnipun contiues to inspire me. Thanks much,
 

Element of Surprise, by Margaret Wheatley

FaceBook  On May 20, 2008 Conrad wrote:
Excellent. It is so good that that I'm not surprised I sent this to 12 people. Thanks much. and peace to all.
 

The Posture of Presence, by Carrie Gray

FaceBook  On May 14, 2008 Conrad wrote:
That is fantastic. Einstein would agree. He spoke of education as thinking something that can't be learned from textbooks. My book, soon to be published by Sense Publishers, Reopening Einstein's Thought: About What Can't Be Learned From Textbooks, embellishes Carrie's ideas. Thank you Carrie, Nipun, and Viral
 

Peace is Not the Ultimate Answer, by Andrew Cohen

FaceBook  On Apr 22, 2008 Conrad wrote:
Thank you Nipun and Viral. We can with balance be involved in what might earlier have been considered a hectic process and we may be able to do it peacefully. Be peace
 

Where the Danger of Transformation Dwells, by John O’Donohue

FaceBook  On Apr 16, 2008 Conrad wrote:
You have my gratitude. Excellent selection. I' sharing it with others.
 

A True Leader, by Dee Hock

FaceBook  On Apr 1, 2008 Conrad wrote:
Dee Hock is outstanding. Too often it seems that schools and univeasities don not have leaders. Thanks much
 

Spirituality: The Seed of Social Action, by Vimala Thakar

FaceBook  On Feb 26, 2008 Conrad wrote:
Thank you so much. This piece is truly outstanding. I very much appreciate receiving writings like this. I continue to be inspired by what you two send. You ontinue to have my gratitude.
 

The Mystery of Silence, by Dorothy Hunt

FaceBook  On Feb 19, 2008 Conrad wrote:
Faantastic. Thank you. I am reminded of the Trappist Thomas Keating who said: "God's first language is silence. All else is a poor translation." Ghandi said : If you don't see God in thr next person you meet, it is a waste of time looking for him further.
 

You Were Made For This, by Clarissa Pinkola Estes

FaceBook  On Jan 29, 2008 Conrad wrote:
I am inspired by what she said. I will email to several people. With gratitude.
 

Power of Blessing, by Rachel Naomi Remen

FaceBook  On Jan 22, 2008 conrad wrote:
Blessings and good vibes to all readers and everyone else. I was encouraged and blessed by what Supun wrote. I too have no god other than everyone and everything.
 

Power of Blessing, by Rachel Naomi Remen

FaceBook  On Jan 22, 2008 Conrad wrote:
I love these letting go ideas. Letting go becomes more important to me as I age. Perhaps I have more to let go of. The last issue of Education Revolution has an excellent artivle by Charles Eisenstein on De-schooling Yourself. It is about letting go of the way schools conribute to acting out of habit rather than mindfully. Thanks much Nipun and Viral.Conrad
 

Technique of the Dance, by Anne Morrow Lindbergh

FaceBook  On Dec 4, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Thank you Nipun. I continue to be inspired by what you send. You have my gratitude. Conrad
 

Being Connected Within, by Jon Kabat-Zinn

FaceBook  On Dec 3, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Nipun,Your selections continue to inspire me. Please keep them coming. Peace to all.
 

The Greatest Danger Before You, by Granny D

FaceBook  On Nov 20, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Fantastic and beautifully written. Einstein said a liberal education would allow us to "think something that can't be learned from textbooks" Granny D must have had that kind of schooling. Thanks Nipun
 

Do-Nothing Cultivation, by Masanobu Fukuoka

FaceBook  On Nov 13, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Beautiful. Meditation seems to also be not doing anthing but noticing. Thank you.
 

Meaning: Where Monk and Child Meet, by David Steindl-Rast

FaceBook  On Oct 16, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Excellent selection-This shows there can be very little difference between Catholics and Buddhists (and other religions).
 

Letting Go Of The Glory, by Richard Carlson

FaceBook  On Aug 14, 2007 conrad wrote:
Thank you Nipun and Viral. Excellent. I needed to hear that.
 

Painting the Inner Sistine Chapel, by Jon Kabat-Zinn

FaceBook  On Aug 7, 2007 Conead wrote:
Thank you Nipun. Excellent.
 

The Gentle Art of Blessing, by Pierre Pradervand

FaceBook  On Jul 26, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Thank you Nipun and Viral. Fantastic quote. I sent it to several people. You have my gratitude
 

Stillness Speaks, by Eckhart Tolle

FaceBook  On Jun 26, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Nipun and Viral, Your selections are outstanding. With gratitude. Conrad
 

Who Was That Masked Man Anyway?, by Lawrence Kushner

FaceBook  On Jun 11, 2007 Conrad wrote:
I have already learned much from Nipun and Viral and from others who have responded to these communications. I am still far away from the dedication and genuineness of Nipun and Viral. I say to myself, and occasionally to others, that it would be good for me to be no one, going nowhere. I use that in the sense of I am no separate self. At age 75 I am still often acting automatically. I often want much attention before I think and turn off my old automatic self. While meditating one day last week. I came to what I thought was a great insight, and that is that I do not have much insight. I at times think I want to be humble and other times I catch myself wanting other people to say, "look how good he is." I read recently that the universe is only 4% matter as we know it and 96% dark energy and dark matter. It seems to me that I don't know much about anything so I experience it it is good not to know in an intellectual sense. I project that on to other people. Being compassionate to myself and others I believe is the way to live whether we know something and not. Without the notion of natural compassion I would never have found my unique way of living. I still have much to learn. Thank you for continuing to give me the opportunity to respond.
 

The Year-To-Live Experiment, by Stephen Levine

FaceBook  On Jun 4, 2007 Conrad wrote:

Excellent selection. I’m reminded of the Paul Coelo’s quote from a recent Viral and Nipun communication: "Tell your heart that the fear of suffering is worse than the suffering itself. And that no heart has ever suffered when it goes in search of its dreams…” I am also reminded of the potential for our schools to educate (help fulfill one’s dreams) by encouraging students to focus on their present fearful experience. When a student is encouraged by a teacher to focus on their present fear, the teacher and student will not know exactly what will arise from the students’ openness to present experience. Openness to any thought or feeling that may arise is an indication of vast openness. Some (more than five or ten pound) scary feelings may temporarily arise, but noticing them can bring less fear in the long run. One can notice that they are not afraid of fear after a more lengthy present noticing of their fear. Focusing on the present is a way of beginning focusing for a year or for a lifetime. My deceased friend, Jim Guinan, was clearly not afraid of his fears. He created (or at least e-mailed me) what I now call the twelve stem ways of behaving (ways to assist in facing and reducing fears and ways to generate that which helps one search for one’s present dreams—I mentioned them several weeks earlier in a similar context). 1. have an increased tendency to let things happen rather than make them happen. 2. have frequent attacks of smiling. 3. have feelings of being connected with others and nature. 4. have frequent, almost overwhelming, episodes of appreciation. 5. have the tendency to think and act spontaneously, rather than from fears based on past experiences. 6. have unmistakable ability to enjoy each moment, and to make the best out of each experience. 7. lose the ability to worry. 8. lose interest in conflict. 9. lose interest in interpreting the actions of others. 10. lose interest in judging others. 11. lose interest in judging self. 12. b  See full.

Excellent selection. I’m reminded of the Paul Coelo’s quote from a recent Viral and Nipun communication: "Tell your heart that the fear of suffering is worse than the suffering itself. And that no heart has ever suffered when it goes in search of its dreams…” I am also reminded of the potential for our schools to educate (help fulfill one’s dreams) by encouraging students to focus on their present fearful experience. When a student is encouraged by a teacher to focus on their present fear, the teacher and student will not know exactly what will arise from the students’ openness to present experience. Openness to any thought or feeling that may arise is an indication of vast openness. Some (more than five or ten pound) scary feelings may temporarily arise, but noticing them can bring less fear in the long run. One can notice that they are not afraid of fear after a more lengthy present noticing of their fear. Focusing on the present is a way of beginning focusing for a year or for a lifetime. My deceased friend, Jim Guinan, was clearly not afraid of his fears. He created (or at least e-mailed me) what I now call the twelve stem ways of behaving (ways to assist in facing and reducing fears and ways to generate that which helps one search for one’s present dreams—I mentioned them several weeks earlier in a similar context). 1. have an increased tendency to let things happen rather than make them happen. 2. have frequent attacks of smiling. 3. have feelings of being connected with others and nature. 4. have frequent, almost overwhelming, episodes of appreciation. 5. have the tendency to think and act spontaneously, rather than from fears based on past experiences. 6. have unmistakable ability to enjoy each moment, and to make the best out of each experience. 7. lose the ability to worry. 8. lose interest in conflict. 9. lose interest in interpreting the actions of others. 10. lose interest in judging others. 11. lose interest in judging self. 12. be compassionate to self and others without expecting anything in return. Thanks for the opportunity to respond.

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Encountering Pure Mystery, by Adyashanti

FaceBook  On May 24, 2007 Conrad wrote:
From my friend Dave after I sent him Ayashanti's comments. "Not thinking about anything is Zen. Once you know this, walking, standing, sitting or lying down, everything you do is Zen. To know that the >mind is empty is to see the Buddha. Using the mind to look for reality is delusion. Not using the mind to look for reality is awareness. Freeing yourself from words is liberation." -- Bodhidharma, 5th-6th century. My note—Is thinking also Zen? Thinking creates delusion but isn’t delusion also Zen? What is not Zen? I don’t know. Cp on 5/24/07 Must one know oneself before one can be not one and not two? Must one be oneself before one can forget oneself? I can’t forget myself when I am not myself. I am not myself when I think I am a separate self. I am not myself when I use “defense mechanisms”/delusion to hide myself from myself and others. Being myself allows me to not be myself (my separate self). All education is to help one know oneself. One can't be oneself unless one knows oneself. As Zen masters have said, the study of Zen is the study of the self. To study the self is to forget the self. . (Using the mind to look for reality is delusion. Not using the mind to look for reality is awareness. Freeing yourself from words is liberation." -- Bodhidharma, 5th-6th century. “The way that can be put into words is not the way.”
 

Encountering Pure Mystery, by Adyashanti

FaceBook  On May 22, 2007 Conrad wrote:
I am still addicted to conceptions. Even the quote:". "It takes a long time to understand nothing," (said Edward Dahlberg) is something I appreciate conceptually in that I tend to give the "nothing" above a "somethingness." Perhaps the more I am aware of my conceiving habit,the more likely I may be willing to experience mystery in a non-conceptual way.I am growing very slowly. Thanks Nipun for a great e-mail.
 

The Soul of Money, by Lynne Twist

FaceBook  On May 14, 2007 Conrad wrote:
I feel like I am enslaving myself because I don't give as much as I think I should. I feel liberated because I haven't bought a new suit in 25 years. I bought a used suit 3 years ago. I never bought a new car until I was age 72, a Prius which I traded for a Corolla when the Prius odometer read 1800 miles. Except for my shoes and most of my underwear, most of my clothes are used from garage sales, rummage sales and secondhand clothing stores, and I feel liberated about that. I actually get a high when I am giving as I should. When I am feeling unliberated and bound, I find it useful to ask myself, "Who binds me?” Xiaoshan’s statement: "Where did all my questions go?" (from last week) made me think that Xiaoshan had much gratitude because he knew there was nothing to question, and his question of (where did all his questions go?) was stimulating and inspirational. When one is not a separate self, there is no one to question, and as Xiaoshan knows, there is nothing to know, nothing to attain and nothing to realize.. Thank you Xiaoshan and Viral for sharing. You have my gratitude.
 

Questioning Our Questions, by Eric Vogt, Juanita Brown, David Isaacs

FaceBook  On May 8, 2007 Conrad wrote:
I'm glad Xiaoshan liked my article. Noticing the present shows how ephemeral everything is. Questions at that level of development may only yield conceptions which are often delusional in that conceptions are often fixed and primarily deal with the nonexistent past or future.
 

Questioning Our Questions, by Eric Vogt, Juanita Brown, David Isaacs

FaceBook  On May 7, 2007 Conrad wrote:

I wrote the following as a guest column three days ago for the BGSU student newspaper. It has not yet been printed. It may be too long, but it does apply . Viral you have my gratitude.Conrad Specialization Can Make You a Slave There is an old and infrequently considered history of education related by Buckminster Fuller which demonstrates how the elite of the military-industrial-governmental complex keep many of us in the dark. When we are in the dark we can be more easily manipulated without being aware of it. Fuller relates how the Great Pirates would establish a land-based home and make someone the Governor. The great pirate would ask that Governor to tell him when a smart young man is noticed. The great pirate would take the young man and ask him to study a specialty such as accounting, finance, navigation, shipbuilding, or some other important skill of the day. The Pirates would tell the young man to only study that specialty because the great pirate would be the only one who will be a comprehensive thinker who dealt with all fields of thought. These specialists were paid reasonably well but they always took orders from the Great Pirate. They were not independent comprehensive thinkers as the Great Pirate was. Specialization that began with the Great Pirates continues in schools and universities and often does not follow what the great philosopher, Alfred North Whitehead, said about learning. Whitehead said there first should be an adventure stage where the student is turned on and becomes inquisitive about finding out more about a field. The second stage would be a precision stage where the student learns much. The third stage and one that is often dismissed by teachers and professors is the generalization stage where one attempts to make connections ( arrive at open big open ideas) not only within a field of knowledge but also between fields of knowledge. Schooling and university training concentrate  See full.

I wrote the following as a guest column three days ago for the BGSU student newspaper. It has not yet been printed. It may be too long, but it does apply . Viral you have my gratitude.Conrad Specialization Can Make You a Slave There is an old and infrequently considered history of education related by Buckminster Fuller which demonstrates how the elite of the military-industrial-governmental complex keep many of us in the dark. When we are in the dark we can be more easily manipulated without being aware of it. Fuller relates how the Great Pirates would establish a land-based home and make someone the Governor. The great pirate would ask that Governor to tell him when a smart young man is noticed. The great pirate would take the young man and ask him to study a specialty such as accounting, finance, navigation, shipbuilding, or some other important skill of the day. The Pirates would tell the young man to only study that specialty because the great pirate would be the only one who will be a comprehensive thinker who dealt with all fields of thought. These specialists were paid reasonably well but they always took orders from the Great Pirate. They were not independent comprehensive thinkers as the Great Pirate was. Specialization that began with the Great Pirates continues in schools and universities and often does not follow what the great philosopher, Alfred North Whitehead, said about learning. Whitehead said there first should be an adventure stage where the student is turned on and becomes inquisitive about finding out more about a field. The second stage would be a precision stage where the student learns much. The third stage and one that is often dismissed by teachers and professors is the generalization stage where one attempts to make connections ( arrive at open big open ideas) not only within a field of knowledge but also between fields of knowledge. Schooling and university training concentrates mainly on the second stage, the specialization stage and as a result, students and former students -- most of us, are often in the dark and rely excessively on other people's thinking rather than deciding for ourselves. Thomas Jefferson held that a major purpose of schooling was to provide conditions whereby each student would decide for oneself what will secure or endanger one’s freedom. Today we are not frequently concerned with openness amd our freedom. Thhe kind of government that conservative government's wish to place in other areas (often the Mid-East) seems now to be overly involved with secrecy and manipulation. An oligarchy now seems to decide much of what our country is doing in Iraq. One way of judging the power of our schools and universities is noting who we choose to be our leaders. What grade would you now give our schools and universities for the leadership we now have at the federal level? If the grade were quite low, can you notice that Whitehead’s adventure and generalization stages have been neglected so that many of us remain in the dark and are easily manipulated by the elite. Beyond these general conceptualizations is more openness to the unknown and even openness to the unknowable.

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Fear: Its Beginning, Middle and End, by J. Krishnamurti

FaceBook  On Apr 30, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Fear -- J. Krishnamurthy If I were reading this, I would want somebody to say: “be silent for a moment and notice what comes to you.” It seems that fear is as unavoidable as pain but by accepting fear and pain, suffering is reduced or eliminated. I never deeply considered fear arising from my thoughts but I do believe that I use thought to avoid fear. "We are what we think. Everything we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts we make the world." If we think we are fearful, we are fearful. Through meditation I occasionally notice my fear and at times, I also notice that I am not afraid of the fear. Although it is rare for me, I believe that being open to my present experience is the key to reducing fear as well as understanding myself. As many of us know, the way to study the self is to forget the self. One who is no one, going nowhere has no fear. Schools would noticeably improve education if a student’s individual fears were the bases of the that student's curricula. Thank you Viral for an excellent selection.
 

Moving in Wholeness, by Vimala Thakar

FaceBook  On Apr 10, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Sorry again. The first line of the Dammapada should read: "We are what we think." NOT We are a we think.
 

Moving in Wholeness, by Vimala Thakar

FaceBook  On Apr 8, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Thakar brings to mind the beginning of the Dhammapada: "We are a we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts we make the world.” When we don't think or conceptualize, we don't know. The value of not knowing conceptually, I believe, is enormous, yet I find I have great difficulty in avoiding thinking and concepts. My use of words causes me to divide this from that when this and that are one. I also think that each of us does the same thing; but we do “it” differently. As Lao Tzu said, “The way they can be said is not the way." The “it” that can be said is not the way. Not being able to say “it” is similar to not knowing. Noticing what one does is more important than noticing what one says. We can notice what one does in a way that cannot be said. Thank you. Peace to all.
 

The Seven Traits of Creative People, by Deepak Chopra

FaceBook  On Apr 3, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Thank you Sudha for the clarification and thank you Xiaoshan for saying "well said" even though there is nothing to say, and thank you Viral for the excellent selection.
 

The Seven Traits of Creative People, by Deepak Chopra

FaceBook  On Mar 30, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Chopra is excellent. H e reminds me of stem cells whichrelate to stem goals and creative stem learning. I am reminded of Dr. James Guinan’s twelve statements which I call stem goals. These stem goals encompass a simple and unassuming manner of life, as Einstein suggested, and they embody a creative contagious element capable of initiating a chain reaction. TWELVE STEM GOALS 1. have an increased tendency to let things happen rather than make them happen. 2. have frequent attacks of smiling. 3. have feelings of being connected with others and nature. 4. have frequent, almost overwhelming, episodes of appreciation. 5. have the tendency to think and act spontaneously, rather than from fears based on past experiences. 6. have unmistakable ability to enjoy each moment, and to make the best out of each experience. 7. lose the ability to worry. 8. lose interest in conflict. 9. lose interest in interpreting the actions of others. 10. lose interest in judging others. 11. lose interest in judging self. 12. be compassionate to self and others without expecting anything in return.
 

In the Lap of Immense Intelligence, by Ken Wilber

FaceBook  On Mar 27, 2007 Conrad wrote:
I'm more positive now that I've read it again. I take back my negative thoughts about Wilber. I now agree 99.9% and I don't know what is holding me from going to 100%.
 

In the Lap of Immense Intelligence, by Ken Wilber

FaceBook  On Mar 25, 2007 Conrad wrote:
I catch myself agreeing with 99% of what is said. I don't believe evolution is a nightmare. I'm not sure the universe has a direction other than what individual choice gives it. I feel somewhat guilty about thinking that Wilbur gives me the impression that he thinks he is a sage on the leading edge. I appreciate not knowing and Wilbur gives me the impression that he thinks he "knows." I am probably somewhat jealous of Wilbur for his ability to express complexities in a simplified way. I like, "there is nothing to know, nothing to attain, and nothing to realize," and Wilbur gives the impression there is. I wonder if I am simply demonstrating my lack of awareness.
 

Shifting Your Relationship With Pain, by Jon Kabat-Zinn

FaceBook  On Mar 15, 2007 Conrad wrote:
I remember when I was seven years old, I wanted others to feel sorry for me for having pain. And at unaware moments as an adult I still catch myself wanting attention in that way. Thank you Viral for providing us with awareness producing material.
 

Witnessing: A Form of Compassion, by James O'dea

FaceBook  On Mar 13, 2007 Conrad wrote:
A quote from Thomas Merton also applies: "In a koan someone said that an enlightened man is not one who seeks Buddha or finds Buddha, but simply an ordinary man who has nothing left to do. Yet stopping is not arriving. To stop is to stay a million miles from it and to do nothing is to miss it by the whole width of the universe. As for arriving, when you arrive you are ruined. Yet how close the solution is: how simple it would be to have nothing more to do if only -- one had really nothing more to do. The man who is unripe cannot get there, no matter what he does or does not do. But the ripe fruit falls out of the tree without even thinking about it. Why? The man who is ripe discovers that there was never anything to be done from the very beginning."
 

Witnessing: A Form of Compassion, by James O'dea

FaceBook  On Mar 7, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Einstein said: “However, if one renounces the assumption that what is present in different parts of space has an independent, real existence, then I don't see at all what physics is supposed to be describing. For what is thought to be a "system" is, after all, just conventional, and I do not see how one is supposed to divide up the world objectively so that one can make statements about the parts.”17 (M. Born, ed., Albert Einstein–Hedwig und Max Born. Briefwechsel 1916–55, Nymphenburger, Munich (1969), p. 223.) Thank you Viral for the opportunity to share athought from Einstein and another from Meister Eckhart who says, "The more deeply we are our true selves, the less self is in us.” Peace,Conrad
 

Ego and the Illusion of Darkness, by Swami Nithyananda

FaceBook  On Mar 1, 2007 Conrad P. Pritscher wrote:
I am touched and have gratitude for Swami’s clarity. I have read similar passages before, but I forgot about them until I read this one. Even though there is no me, I forgive myself for forgetting. My process of getting rid of my ego seems to be a step and an inch forword and a step back. Of course there are no steps as there is no forward or backward. There is only awareness. I am frequently unaware of what I just said. Thank you Viral for giving me an opportunity to respond and for the beautiful, awareness-generating passages you choose. Conrad
 

Evolving From Hope to Hopelessness, by Margaret Wheatley

FaceBook  On Feb 23, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Dean Sluyter in Why The Chicken Crossed the Road, talks about abandoning worry when he says, " A yet more profound liberation into Nowness comes from abandoning hope as well as worry. But that's an advanced technique." I write about it but I rarely do it. I am still often an worrier and a hoper.
 

Evolving From Hope to Hopelessness, by Margaret Wheatley

FaceBook  On Feb 23, 2007 Conrad P. Pritscher wrote:
When speak of hope we frequently speak of the idea of hope. The idea of hope often makes the distinction between the future and present. This is all there is. The here and now is here and now. Some sage said that nothing ever happened in the past and nothing will happen in the future. All that happens, happens now, or happens not at all. There is no future to hope for. I am also reminded that each of us, including myself, wants to know and we frequently know with words and ideas. Hopelessness and hope are not different when the kind of knowing we have knows that the way that can be said is not the way. We can know that compassion, patience, and being peaceful are the way for us, but for some people, words can "prove" to those using them that compassion, patience, and being peaceful are not the way for them. When we are one with everything, there is no need for hope or anything else.
 

The Full Spectrum Of True Wealth, by Wayne Muller

FaceBook  On Feb 19, 2007 Conrad P. Pritscher wrote:
When I read Richard's comment, I wondered whether Tom Edison's, Bill Gates' and Steve Forbes' human capital is any better than anyone or any thing. Contributing a leaf, when that is all you have may be contributing as much as Edison, Gates, or Forbes.
 

Courage to Try the Impossible, by Paulo Coelho

FaceBook  On Feb 14, 2007 Conrad Pritscher wrote:
After reading this I think of Ghandi's quote ( which probably came from Nipun and Viral),"If you don't see God in the next person you meet it is a waste of time looking for him further," I also think of Thomas Merton's quote which I just read:""Zen: not abstract at all in the way I see it. I use it for idol-cracking and things like that. Healthy way of keeping one's house clean. Gets the dust out quicker than anything else I know. I am not talking about purity, just breathing, and not piling up the mental junk." Peace to all. Conrad
 

The Most Precious Freedom, by David Foster Wallace

FaceBook  On Feb 13, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Nipun, I read this "thought of the week" and responded before I finished reading your entire earlier message. I am writing a book and I am a embarrassed to notice that you choose to send thoughts that are expressed much more eloquently than my expressions even though the topics are often similar. With Gratitude. Conrad
 

The Most Precious Freedom, by David Foster Wallace

FaceBook  On Feb 13, 2007 Conrad wrote:
Nipun, You frequently send what I am need of hearing. With gratitude. Conrad
 

Living at the Right Speed, by Carl Honore

FaceBook  On Feb 6, 2007 Conrad P. Pritscher wrote:
I sent my comments to several friends but I added, since they know me: "Ifear you will not hear me because my actions speak so loudly." Conrad P.
 

Living at the Right Speed, by Carl Honore

FaceBook  On Feb 6, 2007 Conrad P. Pritscher wrote:
One of my all-time favorite quotes is from Dean's Sluyters, The Zen Commandments. I have read the quote at least six times in the last three or four weeks. I have been meditating for over 15 years and I am still somewhat surprised that I am still often in a rush in an unaware way. Today's quote reminds me of this favorite Dean Sluyter quote from his page 15. He says: "So the way to boundless experience is not to seek boundless experience or any particular experience beyond whatever presents itself. This non-seeking does take practice, not to get "better" at "doing" it, since there is no doing involved, but to give our old seeking habit some road upon which to run out of gas. Sooner or later, we give up and just let the infinite (or whatever you want to call it) engulf us. By definition, the infinite is everywhere and everything; ocean can never be absent from even the smallest drop of wave. We've simply been distracted from it by our constant compulsion to look somewhere else for something more.” Thank you Nipun for continuing to provide inspiration. With gratitude. Conrad P. Pritscher
 

Cultivating Affirmation, by Patricia Ryan Madson

FaceBook  On Dec 19, 2006 Conrad P. Pritscher wrote:
This is great. I will use the "yes/and" today. Thank you.
 

Totality Not Perfection, by Osho

FaceBook  On Dec 6, 2006 Conrad wrote:
Thanks so much for noting the difference and for finding what I was missing. You have my gratitude. Conrad
 

Divided You Suffer, United You Dance, by Osho

FaceBook  On Dec 5, 2006 Conrad Pritscher wrote:
The first paragraph mentions doing things as well as one can. I agree with that. I do not agree with that totally because I do not know what total means more always may be added. If robbing a bank was my activity, and if I did it wholeheartedly and totally, Osho’s statement implies that I would find joy. The word total also implies perfection and this is something that I am not. I am more nearly perfect by accepting my imperfections and reducing those imperfections that harm myself or others. I believe that "the way that can be said is not the way" and Osho’s saying "totally" is not the way for me. As I think more about the situation, I am more inclined to simply say I don't know. Conrad
 

The Practice of Happiness, by Tal Ben-Shahar

FaceBook  On Nov 28, 2006 Conrad wrote:
Nipun, Your site is my favorite. I continue to be inspired. You have my deepest gratitude. Conrad
 

Become What You Are, by Alan Watts

FaceBook  On Jun 13, 2006 Conrad Pritscher wrote:
I love the stuff you send and Watts is great.