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Previous Comments By 'btilleylmt'

Can You Love The One Who..., by Leah Pearlman

FaceBook  On Jan 29, 2013 Beth wrote:
 This is the major lesson to learn for me this lifetime, for I have been disowned from my parents and in my time of most need cast aside by my sister.  These are people who when needs arise they conveniently forget the past and sweep the mess under the rug and go forward never to speak of things again.  When my father was dying it was me who has the temperament, compassion, and kindness to sit with the near dead and dying.  As I did I began to see the man inside the mask.  Although I longed for him to say he loved me he never did, yet in his eyes I saw how much he did care and how deep his love really was.  I have to wonder if that isn't the same with the rest of the family.  Year after year of their selfish behavior I have offered less and less opportunity for them to hurt me.  Yet by distancing myself I am doing anything?  Time after time I have allowed myself to to be hurt and this has been my course of action, to disassociate.  This poem makes me realize how much love we each possess.  For me to grasp this lesson, I have been bringing myself back into their lives and see them as they are and love them with all their faults and limitations.  I do however still keep it safe by not speaking politics and religion lol.  I've also given up hope of them ever seeing me as I truly am so if they do it will be a most pleasant surprise.
 

Social Intelligence, by Daniel Goleman

FaceBook  On Jan 3, 2013 Beth Tilley wrote:
 I agree with Narendra.  Most often when I am confronted with a person who is "having a bad day" I do my best to give them attention that is "love filled".  I do my best to help them overcome their negativity.  Most of the time a nice genuine "SMILE" is a very contagious thing.  Once given it is rarely not noticed and if not immediately accepted, I'd like to bet that it was not forgotten but remembered somewhere down the day and resurrected and reused in an appropriate circumstance.
 

The Challenge of Gift-Giving, by Nitin Paranjape

FaceBook  On Nov 29, 2012 beth tilley wrote:

 I live in rural upstate New York and it has always been my forte to give homemade gifts or a gift with meaning.  For me it isn't a gift unless it is meaningful, which sometimes leaves me thinking a long time.  You have to really know the person in order to give a gift that is heartfelt, which is why sometimes it is so hard.  I find myself feeling obligated to give everyone I know something.  It is so overwhelming that I have to admit wishing that we abolish Christmas. In years past I painted a sweatshirt with a picture of the Grinch for my father... He loved it.  I also made him a stain glass of the New York State Conservation emblem, which he was an officer for 25+years.  When my boys were little and were completely enthralled with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles we made a "sewer city" of PVC pipes on a 4'x4' piece of plywood.  I have been a licensed massage therapist for the past eight years and  I have begun giving a gift to my monthly, loyal patrons.  Twice I have sewn  microwave able neck warmers, given homemade soap, purchased from a local musician his soothing guitar CD, and this year, although not made by me, I am giving a canvas tote bag with my logo, "massage for the health of it" and the favorite mint candy I have in my office. It is,however, harder and harder for the ideas to come.  I am not sure if it is because of so many consumer products we are faced with throughout this time of year.   I find that my mood and desire for the holiday is less than festive because of the pressure of gift giving.  It's just too much. This year, however, I feel festive.  It is because I have found the most precious gifts for my loved ones.  Gifts that are personal  things I remembered hearing them mention and remembered.  My heart if full at least one more year with joy for the meaning of Christmas because I have touched on the act of giving with lov  See full.

 I live in rural upstate New York and it has always been my forte to give homemade gifts or a gift with meaning.  For me it isn't a gift unless it is meaningful, which sometimes leaves me thinking a long time.  You have to really know the person in order to give a gift that is heartfelt, which is why sometimes it is so hard.  I find myself feeling obligated to give everyone I know something.  It is so overwhelming that I have to admit wishing that we abolish Christmas.
In years past I painted a sweatshirt with a picture of the Grinch for my father... He loved it.  I also made him a stain glass of the New York State Conservation emblem, which he was an officer for 25+years.  When my boys were little and were completely enthralled with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles we made a "sewer city" of PVC pipes on a 4'x4' piece of plywood. 
I have been a licensed massage therapist for the past eight years and  I have begun giving a gift to my monthly, loyal patrons.  Twice I have sewn  microwave able neck warmers, given homemade soap, purchased from a local musician his soothing guitar CD, and this year, although not made by me, I am giving a canvas tote bag with my logo, "massage for the health of it" and the favorite mint candy I have in my office.
It is,however, harder and harder for the ideas to come.  I am not sure if it is because of so many consumer products we are faced with throughout this time of year.   I find that my mood and desire for the holiday is less than festive because of the pressure of gift giving.  It's just too much.
This year, however, I feel festive.  It is because I have found the most precious gifts for my loved ones.  Gifts that are personal  things I remembered hearing them mention and remembered.  My heart if full at least one more year with joy for the meaning of Christmas because I have touched on the act of giving with love and meaning once again.
Beth Tilley

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