Awakin.org

Waking up to Wisdom
In Stillness and Community

Previous Comments By 'Sshariq'

Seekers of Ultimate Mystery, by Fr. Thomas Keating

FaceBook  On Jan 6, 2012 Shariq wrote:

Thank you for sharing this inspiring clarity from Fr. Keating, it conveys beautifully what is felt deeply and yet quite difficult to express in words. Indeed, human family is already one, as it is so spiritually as well as genetically: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0603/feature2/images/mp_download.2.pdf. Perhaps, path to awareness of our being one family, now more than ever, may lie in our being able to bring together what we can seek spiritually with what we can seek empirically. This is how I envision Gandhiji may have pursued his own inner journey as a scholar-practitioner of his Swagyanic truth. He had inquired and reflected on spirituality, literature, politics, economy and science, among the areas that he was drawn to, and then to have synthesized these into practices of his own by creating his life journey as an experiment with truth to cultivate the promise of his practices to realize his potential for serving others with what he was uniquely blessed with. The fact that the essence of Gandhiji’s practices bring together reason with contemplation in seeking truth is not new though it remains largly under explored horizon of human potential that may possibly hold the ultimate gifts to the seekers of ultimate mystery!  Gandhiji’s holistic inquiries into truth included his awareness of implicit sense of beauty in truth as well, as he said in response to the question - Is there truth in a sunset or a crescent moon that shines amid the stars at night?:  “Indeed, these beauties are truthful, inasmuch as they make me think of the Creator at the back of them. How else could these be beautiful, but for the Truth that is in the center of creation? When I admire the wonder of a sunset or the beauty of the moon, my soul expands in worship of the Creator. I try to see Him and His mercies in all these creations. But even the sunsets and sunrises would be mere hindrances if they did not help me to think of the soul is a delusion and  See full.

Thank you for sharing this inspiring clarity from Fr. Keating, it conveys beautifully what is felt deeply and yet quite difficult to express in words. Indeed, human family is already one, as it is so spiritually as well as genetically: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0603/feature2/images/mp_download.2.pdf. Perhaps, path to awareness of our being one family, now more than ever, may lie in our being able to bring together what we can seek spiritually with what we can seek empirically. This is how I envision Gandhiji may have pursued his own inner journey as a scholar-practitioner of his Swagyanic truth. He had inquired and reflected on spirituality, literature, politics, economy and science, among the areas that he was drawn to, and then to have synthesized these into practices of his own by creating his life journey as an experiment with truth to cultivate the promise of his practices to realize his potential for serving others with what he was uniquely blessed with. The fact that the essence of Gandhiji’s practices bring together reason with contemplation in seeking truth is not new though it remains largly under explored horizon of human potential that may possibly hold the ultimate gifts to the seekers of ultimate mystery!  Gandhiji’s holistic inquiries into truth included his awareness of implicit sense of beauty in truth as well, as he said in response to the question - Is there truth in a sunset or a crescent moon that shines amid the stars at night?:  Indeed, these beauties are truthful, inasmuch as they make me think of the Creator at the back of them. How else could these be beautiful, but for the Truth that is in the center of creation? When I admire the wonder of a sunset or the beauty of the moon, my soul expands in worship of the Creator. I try to see Him and His mercies in all these creations. But even the sunsets and sunrises would be mere hindrances if they did not help me to think of the soul is a delusion and a snare; even like the body, which often does hinder you in the path of salvation.” [Source: Teachings of Mahatma Gandhi, edited by Jag Parvesh Chander, 1945, p. 29]

Hide full comment.

 

Make Death Your Ally, by Duane Elgin

FaceBook  On Jul 10, 2011 Shariq wrote:

As the philosopher says, "death is not an event in life: we do not live to experience death" and, as such, the taste of what happens to us then may pass us by, though, as the poet says, because of what happens to us then we come alive as the taste of love in each morsel that nurtures the creation until the end of the time: Post Humus Scatter my ashes in my gardenso I can be near my loves.Say a few honest words, sing a gentle song,join hands in a circle of flesh.Please tell some storiesabout me making you laugh.I love to make you laugh.When I've had time to settleand green gathers into buds,remember I love blossomsbursting in spring.As the season ripensremember my persistent passion.And if you come in my gardenon an August afternoon,pluck a bright red globe,let juice run down your chinand the seeds stick to your cheek.When I'm dead I want folks to smileand say, "That Patti, she sure issome tomato!"Source: Patti Tana, Ask the Dreamer Where Night Begins: Poems & Postscripts, 1986  See full.

As the philosopher says, "death is not an event in life: we do not live to experience death" and, as such, the taste of what happens to us then may pass us by, though, as the poet says, because of what happens to us then we come alive as the taste of love in each morsel that nurtures the creation until the end of the time:
 
Post Humus
 
Scatter my ashes in my garden
so I can be near my loves.
Say a few honest words, 
sing a gentle song,
join hands in a circle of flesh.
Please tell some stories
about me making you laugh.
I love to make you laugh.

When I've had time to settle
and green gathers into buds,
remember I love blossoms
bursting in spring.
As the season ripens
remember my persistent passion.

And if you come in my garden
on an August afternoon,
pluck a bright red globe,
let juice run down your chin
and the seeds stick to your cheek.

When I'm dead I want folks to smile
and say, "That Patti, she sure is
some tomato!"

Source: Patti Tana,
Ask the Dreamer Where Night Begins:
Poems & Postscripts, 1986


Hide full comment.

 

The Mystery of Love, by Kent Nerburn

FaceBook  On Jul 4, 2011 Shariq wrote:

As the mystery of love unfolds it resonates with/in us:  "When we are in love, our love is too big a thing for us to be able altogether to contain it within ourselves. It radiates towards the loved one, finds there a surface that arrests it, forcing it to return to its starting point, and it is this repercussion of our own feeling which we call the other's feelings and which charms us more then than on its outward journey because we do not recognize it as having originated in ourselves.  – Marcel Proust

 

Giving Within For-Give-Ness, by Michael Bernard Beckwith

FaceBook  On Apr 24, 2011 Shariq wrote:

 As children we are closer to our feelings and we are motivated to repair our broken relationships by forgiving because we rather be friends and play together. Being able to truly forgive is more of a possibility when we are able to be in touch with our innocence. Dag Hammarskjold says this well:  "Forgiveness is the answer to the child’s dream of a miracle by which what is broken is made whole again, what is soiled is made clean again.” But then, it can be easier to forgive others then our own selves since it often requires us to let go of our unforgiving selves.

 

Before You Know What Kindness Really Is, by Naomi Shihab Nye

FaceBook  On Apr 21, 2011 Shariq wrote:

Greetings! This is a lovely poem, thank you for sharing it. I believe we feel kindness in its happening when our gentle nurturing presence comes alive in offering/receiving love during the moments of humility and oneness with the world. It reminds me of Parker Palmer's intuitive sense of kindness that resonates with my own sense that I am struggling to share here: "Š as winters turn into spring, I find it not only hard to cope with mud but also hard to credit the small harbingers of larger life to come, hard to hope until the outcome is secure. Spring teaches me to look more carefully for the green stems of possibility; for the intuitive hunch that may turn into a larger insight, for the glance or touch that may thaw a frozen relationship, for the stranger's act of kindness that makes the world seem hospitable again." (Source: Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation)

 

Practically Preposterous, by Pavithra Mehta

FaceBook  On Mar 16, 2011 Shariq wrote:

Thank you Pavi for sharing your provocative thoughts on Gandhiji's preposterous ways; this is truly ingenious. Gandhiji was a man well ahead of his time and we are just beginning to catch-up with his way of thinking, particularly if we were to imagine our experience of being in Sean Carroll's universe rather than Lewis Carroll's universe. As it turns out, according to Sean Carroll, the Professor of Theoretical Physics at Cal Tech, we all may be living in a preposterous universe - please note the name he has chosen for his website: preposterousuniverse.com! His deeper thoughts on the Preposterous Universe can be found here: preposterousuniverse.com/preposterous.html, and for a light hearted version here he is on the Cobert Report: preposterousuniverse.com/talks/videos.html. What took the rest of us so long to realize the truth of the pervasiveness of the preposterousness?

 

An Undying Faith of the Infinite in Us, by Rabindranath Tagore

FaceBook  On Oct 26, 2010 Shariq wrote:

  While reflecting on, "[w]e see truth when we set our mind towards the infinite", I recalled a passage from Sadhna that had resonated with me the most. Here is that much cherished passage:   "Knowledge is partial, because our intellect is an instrument, it is only a part of us, it can give us information about things which can be divided and analysed, and whose properties can be classified part by part. But Brahma is perfect, and knowledge which is partial can never be a knowledge of him.   But he can be known by joy, by love. For joy is knowledge in its completeness, it is knowing by our whole being. Intellect sets us apart from the things to be known, but love knows its object by fusion. Such knowledge is immediate and admits no doubt. It is the same as knowing our own selves, only more so."   In this passage, 'For joy is knowledge in its completeness, it is knowing by our whole being' has a deep felt sense for me, yet it is difficult to express this sense within the context of everyday experiences.    Perhaps in practicing to experience 'knowledge in its completeness'  lies the joyous realization of the presence of, "The ideal of truth... in the consciousness of the whole" in our whole being with immediacy and without any doubt similar to how we may feel in knowing our own selves, only more so.    See full.

 

While reflecting on, "[w]e see truth when we set our mind towards the infinite", I recalled a passage from Sadhna that had resonated with me the most. Here is that much cherished passage:

 

"Knowledge is partial, because our intellect is an instrument, it is only a part of us, it can give us information about things which can be divided and analysed, and whose properties can be classified part by part. But Brahma is perfect, and knowledge which is partial can never be a knowledge of him.

 

But he can be known by joy, by love. For joy is knowledge in its completeness, it is knowing by our whole being. Intellect sets us apart from the things to be known, but love knows its object by fusion. Such knowledge is immediate and admits no doubt. It is the same as knowing our own selves, only more so."

 

In this passage, 'For joy is knowledge in its completeness, it is knowing by our whole being' has a deep felt sense for me, yet it is difficult to express this sense within the context of everyday experiences. 

 

Perhaps in practicing to experience 'knowledge in its completeness'  lies the joyous realization of the presence of, "The ideal of truth... in the consciousness of the whole" in our whole being with immediacy and without any doubt similar to how we may feel in knowing our own selves, only more so.

 

Hide full comment.

 

A Neuron with Imagination, by Francisco Ramos Stierle

FaceBook  On Sep 24, 2010 Shariq wrote:

Thank you for sharing Pancho's insightful perspective. Pancho's thoughts on vulnerability resonates with my own research on this topic and also bring to mind the thoughtful interview that Richard Whittaker had conducted with Professor Charles Bigger (see attached). Professor Bigger shares this precious insight in the interview, "... I think aesthetic education would be so important early. To develop people's vulnerabilities."